Based on an assignment for a class in variable media. Rory McGuire’s to blame for inspiring me to waste 30 perfectly good minutes of my life.

If you have no idea what this is, try these links entries on the pepper spray and Han Shot First memes.

Pocos Blue medRichard Rinehart, co-author with Still Water’s Jon Ippolito of the forthcoming MIT book New Media and Social Memory, presents conclusions from the book at the POCOS/HATII symposium on Software Art in Glasgow on 11 October.

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Francis Ford Coppola may be best known for directing blockbusters like The Godfather and Apocalypse Now, but he’s giving over control of his latest flick to a digital DJ.

While Coppola’s remixable film may sound outlandish to some, in new media circles it’s almost old hat. Mike Figgis remixed his 2000 film Timecode–already unusual for its four screens of the same footage shot in one take with no editing–live at the 2006 Zero One festival curated by Steve Dietz. And a self-remixing film has been the subject of a number of U-Me capstones.

Timecode (2000) Four cameras. One take. No edits. Real time. http://m.imdb.com/title/tt0220100

Compare Twixt:

Coppola turned members of the Hall H crowd into test subjects for his wild idea to turn movies into live entertainment. Accompanied onstage by musician Dan Deacon and actor Val Kilmer, Coppola used a touchpad to select scenes from Twixt on the fly as Deacon tweaked the soundtrack.

Coppola said Twixt was conceived as a way to inject a live feel into cinema.

“What I’d love to do is go on tour,” he said, “like a month before the film opened, and go to all the cities myself, with my collaborators, with live music and actually perform the film for each audience uniquely for them — a different version for each audience. That’s what opera was like.”

Twixt centers on a horror writer who stumbles onto strange goings-on, and maybe vampires, in a small town. During one segment screened Saturday, the writer, played by Val Kilmer, brainstorms alone in his hotel room. Coppola and his tech crew spliced together different mixes of the montage, during which Kilmer assumed various personas.

“Theoretically, I could push the Shuffle button,” Coppola said.

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/uSwOEiYQREI/

Envisioning Technology 2011 02 25Point-and-shoot cameras and the music industry are dying, pundits say. So what’s to come? Pundits have the answer for that too–in fact they have a whole fancy infographic for it.

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As much as I like crazy game reinterpretations, I find this one disturbing. It makes me wonder if all those times sitting in traffic in midtown Manhattan I was actually under the control of aliens playing a game of Find the Parking Place.

http://science.slashdot.org/story/11/01/15/149225/Play-emPacmanem-emPinballem-and-emPongem-With-a-Paramecium?from=rss via Byline An anonymous reader writes “Science is rarely ever this cool! ‘Physicist Ingmar Riedel-Kruse and his team from Stanford University have done just that by creating versions of classic games that you can navigate by physically controlling living organisms. A game called PAC-mecium is Pacman with a twist: players use a console to change the polarity of an electrical field in a fluid chamber filled with paramecia, which makes the organisms move in different directions. A camera sends real-time images to a computer, where they are superimposed onto a game board (see video above). By looking at the screen, a player can guide the paramecia to eat virtual yeast cells and make them avoid Pacman-like fish. A microprocessor tracks the movement of the organisms to keep score.’ Also available are versions of Pinball, Pong, and soccer.”

Some people will do anything to pass NMD102. At least when Variable Media students recreated Pacman in the university parking lot, no one ended up in the hospital ;)

http://games.slashdot.org/story/10/12/29/2312254/Real-Life-emFroggerem-Ends-In-Hospital-Visit?from=rss

BigSes writes “A 23-year old man has been hospitalized after police in South Carolina say he was hit by an SUV while playing a real-life version of the video game Frogger. Authorities said the 23-year-old man was taken to a hospital in Anderson after he was struck Monday evening. Before he was hit, police say the man had been discussing the game with his friends. Chief Jimmy Dixon says the man yelled ‘go’ and darted into oncoming traffic in the four-lane highway. Has it come time to ban some of the classics before someone else goes out and breaks a few bricks with their heads after eating a large mushroom?”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

A game developer / musician releases musical snippets as though they were object-oriented code.

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/wa8_KyJXKgE/ via Byline Web game developer and musician Gabriel Walsh released his album, The Earthly Frames, Volume 1 in a unique fashion, supplementing his musical content with audio samples for remixing and a series of unique “fragment” files on fifty USB drives for the album’s release. While the fragment files may be enjoyed in isolation, assembling the disparate fragments spins a narrative that is partially autobiographical and partially fictional.

Meanwhile, blog-turned-MTV-rival Pitchfork is making music videos more interactive.

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/VSEEXRqEIVU/ via Byline The influential music blog Pitchfork continues its expansion into video with the launch of six-camera webcasts that let you choose your view, while listening to high-fidelity audio too often missing from live online music, and they’re financing it all with their own revenue.

I’m a big fan of the John Cage | Fluxus Happening | guerilla urban architecture mashup Frozen Grand Central. I’m also a fan of public transportation. So you can imagine my delight when I stepped off the metro at UCLA’s Westwood & La Conte and stumbled upon this:
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> http://www.swfme.com/view/1046212

(via Ari Epstein)

> http://www.swfme.com/view/1046212

(via Ari Epstein)

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I find myself agreeing with this passage by art-theorist-cum-Luddite Nicholas Bourriaud. Should I see a doctor?

This evolution can be seen in the way works are made: a new type of form is appearing, the journey-form, made of lines drawn both in space and time, materialising trajectories rather than destinations. The form of the work expresses a course, a wandering, rather than a fixed space-time.

Altermodern art is thus read as a hypertext; artists translate and transcode information from one format to another, and wander in geography as well as in history. This gives rise to practices which might be referred to as “time-specific”, in response to the “site- specific” work of the 1960s.

http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2010/03/the-altermodern/

I find myself agreeing with this passage by art-theorist-cum-Luddite Nicholas Bourriaud. Should I see a doctor?

This evolution can be seen in the way works are made: a new type of form is appearing, the journey-form, made of lines drawn both in space and time, materialising trajectories rather than destinations. The form of the work expresses a course, a wandering, rather than a fixed space-time.

Altermodern art is thus read as a hypertext; artists translate and transcode information from one format to another, and wander in geography as well as in history. This gives rise to practices which might be referred to as “time-specific”, in response to the “site- specific” work of the 1960s.

http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2010/03/the-altermodern/

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LACE’s archives are an invaluable site of cultural history for Los Angeles, as LACE has been a crucial participant in the city’s artistic production for over three decades, often housing artwork that is experimental in nature. This LACE Archives Internship is an opportunity to work with LACE’s unique collections, which include documentation of art exhibitions and performances held at LACE since 1978, extensive holdings of photographic and video material and records pertaining to the institution’s history.

The LACE Archives Internship will provide an interested individual with the opportunity to gain training and experience working with archival collections. In addition to providing training in widely held standards and protocol of collections management, it also offers a unique introduction to working with collections related to experimental and variable media art. The Archives Intern will: – Learn first-hand about collections-management issues and make use of an extensive database specifically designed by Franklin Furnace Archive to meet the needs of collections of conceptual and other variable media art; – Learn about ways that archival collections are made publicly accessible and work with the LACE Archives Fellow to integrate the catalogue of LACE’s holdings into searchable online databases; – Process a variety of material from LACE’s recent exhibitions and events (e.g. photographs, video, press clippings, correspondence), attending to preservation concerns and updating the archives database as needed; – Respond to research inquiries about LACE’s archive and facilitate the use of collections by LACE staff members and visiting scholars and artists; – Digitize selected items from LACE’s collections, including videos, slides and printed matter; – Work with the LACE Archives Fellow to develop online resources that will provide broad access to, and contextualization of LACE’s digitized collections, including project-specific and thematic websites; – Think creatively about how to generate broad interest in LACE’s archival collections; and – Serve as a liaison with LACE’s webmaster to facilitate the integration of documents from the archive into LACE’s website. Application instructions: Send a resume, references, and a cover letter explaining the reasons for your interest in this position to: Jennifer Flores Sternad at jennifer [AT] welcometolace [DOT] org

LACE internships require a commitment of approx. 16 hours per week for a minimum of three months. For further information, please contact Jennifer via e-mail or at (323) 957-1777 x 11. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

http://www.idealist.org/if/i/en/av/Internship/150335-235

LACE’s archives are an invaluable site of cultural history for Los Angeles, as LACE has been a crucial participant in the city’s artistic production for over three decades, often housing artwork that is experimental in nature. This LACE Archives Internship is an opportunity to work with LACE’s unique collections, which include documentation of art exhibitions and performances held at LACE since 1978, extensive holdings of photographic and video material and records pertaining to the institution’s history.

The LACE Archives Internship will provide an interested individual with the opportunity to gain training and experience working with archival collections. In addition to providing training in widely held standards and protocol of collections management, it also offers a unique introduction to working with collections related to experimental and variable media art. The Archives Intern will: – Learn first-hand about collections-management issues and make use of an extensive database specifically designed by Franklin Furnace Archive to meet the needs of collections of conceptual and other variable media art; – Learn about ways that archival collections are made publicly accessible and work with the LACE Archives Fellow to integrate the catalogue of LACE’s holdings into searchable online databases; – Process a variety of material from LACE’s recent exhibitions and events (e.g. photographs, video, press clippings, correspondence), attending to preservation concerns and updating the archives database as needed; – Respond to research inquiries about LACE’s archive and facilitate the use of collections by LACE staff members and visiting scholars and artists; – Digitize selected items from LACE’s collections, including videos, slides and printed matter; – Work with the LACE Archives Fellow to develop online resources that will provide broad access to, and contextualization of LACE’s digitized collections, including project-specific and thematic websites; – Think creatively about how to generate broad interest in LACE’s archival collections; and – Serve as a liaison with LACE’s webmaster to facilitate the integration of documents from the archive into LACE’s website. Application instructions: Send a resume, references, and a cover letter explaining the reasons for your interest in this position to: Jennifer Flores Sternad at jennifer [AT] welcometolace [DOT] org

LACE internships require a commitment of approx. 16 hours per week for a minimum of three months. For further information, please contact Jennifer via e-mail or at (323) 957-1777 x 11. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

http://www.idealist.org/if/i/en/av/Internship/150335-235

The first in a series of reports from Montreal’s DOCAM conference on preserving art endangered by technological or cultural obsolescence. What’s going to kill off your installation? Analog media–analog TV signals, video projectors, and even food–are probably the fastest poison.

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Still Water lab, 4th floor, Chadbourne Hall

Monday 30 November 4-5:30pm

Italian curator Laura Barreca contrasts the long view of traditional art history and conservation with the brief lifespan of contemporary artistic media, asking how works in ephemeral media should be preserved for the future in the light of controversies such as the restoration of the Sistine Chapel. All are welcome to attend this informal discussion for all or part of the allotted time.

Currently an Italian Academy Fellow at Columbia University, Laura Barreca has taught at the Faculty of Architecture, University “La Sapienza”, Rome, as professor of the Course of History of Contemporary Art, in 2009. She is Assistant Professor of the Chair of History of Contemporary Art, Faculty of Conservation of Cultural and Artistic Heritage, University of Viterbo. She works as external consultant for the Ministero dei Beni e delle Attività Culturali, for the Land Art project “Sensi Contemporanei” (Basilicata 2009). For the MAXXI-Museo nazionale delle arti del XXI secolo she is curator of the project “Committenze contemporanee”, in collaboration with UniCredit Group and Galleria Borghese. Since 2007, she worked as Junior Curator at PAN| Palazzo delle Arti Napoli. Since the completion of her Ph.D., she has been writing articles and papers, and has been invited to present lectures in several conferences (Madrid 2007; Montreal 2008; Rome 2008-2009) about “Conservation and Documentation of New Media Art”.

This discussion is sponsored by the U-Me New Media Department, The Intermedia MFA Program and the Cultural Affairs Distinguished Lecture Series Fund.

Conservation programs of museums are far removed from the “proliferative preservation” of digital creators.

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