Mi c With i Phone and i pad illIt’s never been easier to get music onto a phone, whether it’s yours or someone else’s. These tools help you find and record music–and even bust out an app for your band using HTML5.

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Skateboard manufacturers, coffee bars, and tattoo parlors are all new media industries–they just don’t know it yet. Here’s how to convince them to hire you.

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Give linguists 140 characters and they’ll predict whether you’re a guy or girl two times out of three.

“Remember when the Gay Girl in Damascus revealed himself as a middle-aged man from Georgia? On a platform like Twitter, which doesn’t ask for much biographical information, it’s easy (and fun!) to take on a fake persona but now linguistic researchers have developed an algorithm that can predict the gender of a tweeter based solely on the 140 characters they choose to tweet. The research is based on the idea that women use language differently than men. ‘The mere fact of a tweet containing an exclamation mark or a smiley face meant that odds were a woman was tweeting, for instance,’ reports David Zax. Other research corroborates these findings, finding that women tend to use emoticons, abbreviations, repeated letters and expressions of affection more than men and linguists have also developed a list of gender-skewed words used more often by women including love, ha-ha, cute, omg, yay, hahaha, happy, girl, hair, lol, hubby, and chocolate. Remarkably, even when only provided with one tweet, the program could correctly identify gender 65.9% of the time. (PDF). Depending on how successful the program is proven to be, it could be used for ad-targeting, or for socio-linguistic research.”

http://tech.slashdot.org/story/11/07/28/2244236/Linguists-Out-Men-Impersonating-Women-On-Twitter

This result follows a recent spate of articles in the mainstream media arguing that language reflects how you think. While emphasizing cultural rather than gender divergences, some of this research suggests profoundly different worldviews. For example, the Pormpuraaw people of aboriginal Australia speak of “my southwest foot” instead of “my left foot.”

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703467304575383131592767868.html

The New York Times reports on the increasingly frequent–but still very controversial–practice of incorporating Twitter and other “backchannel” communication networks into the classroom. Do such conversations make classes more inclusive or more distracting?

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SealThe raid is liveblogged when one of Bin Laden’s neighbors complains about the noisy helicopters on Twitter, while Bin Laden’s compound gets 3 of 5 stars on Google Maps. Also in the news: weaponized dogs and a tale of two seals.

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Over the past month, new media scholars have spilled a lot of digital ink arguing whether the Internet actually fostered the 2011 revolution in Egypt, Tunisia, and other Middle East countries–or whether it simply created a dependency that governments can shut down to stymie protesters. Here’s a “Middle East Internet Scorecard” showing where and when governments have cut off their citizens’ access to the net. 

How hard would it be for, say, President Beck to shut down Google, Facebook, and the like in the US of A? Read this Middle East censorship roundup to find out what Egyptians, Libyans, and the rest of us can do to safeguard access to a global electronic network.

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I never thought of Twitter’s randomness as an asset, but in this writer’s response I can see a valuable antidote to Facebook’s inbred circles. Following strangers becomes a form of human channel surfing.

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/1SbUhWYbwC4/ via Byline Over at Gizmodo, Joel Johnson makes a convincing argument for adding random strangers to your twitter feed.

Read on to see how Johnson correlates hearing a diversity of viewpoints with creativity.

I never thought of Twitter’s randomness as an asset, but in this writer’s response I can see a valuable antidote to Facebook’s inbred circles. Following strangers becomes a form of human channel surfing.

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/1SbUhWYbwC4/ via Byline Over at Gizmodo, Joel Johnson makes a convincing argument for adding random strangers to your twitter feed.

Read on to see how Johnson correlates hearing a diversity of viewpoints with creativity.

Bookmark this category
TW1TT3Rart marks a leap forward in posting imagery on Twitter. While tweeting traditional jpgs this is not, TW1TT3Rart serves as a repository for the numerous efforts made by aspiring Twitter artists from across the web. Described as a way of “Tweeting abstraction with glyphs and symbols”, (tagged #twitterart, #140art, #ASCIIart, #TwitClipArt), the Twitter profile displays how one can utilize an established technology for a much different purpose than may have been intended.

See more at http://twitter.com/TW1TT3Rart

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