Aug 222010
 

Fred Brooks: design starts with scarcity.

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/zBtNIiLINAU/ via Byline Computer scientist Fred Brooks told the world how to design software in The Mythical Man-Month. Now, 35 years later, he’s back with The Design of Design, which extends his ideas into fields such as architecture and leadership….

“The critical thing about the design process is to identify your scarcest resource. Despite what you may think, that very often is not money. For example, in a NASA moon shot, money is abundant but lightness is scarce; every ounce of weight requires tons of material below. On the design of a beach vacation home, the limitation may be your ocean-front footage. You have to make sure your whole team understands what scarce resource you’re optimizing.”

Apr 022010
 

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I find myself agreeing with this passage by art-theorist-cum-Luddite Nicholas Bourriaud. Should I see a doctor?

This evolution can be seen in the way works are made: a new type of form is appearing, the journey-form, made of lines drawn both in space and time, materialising trajectories rather than destinations. The form of the work expresses a course, a wandering, rather than a fixed space-time.

Altermodern art is thus read as a hypertext; artists translate and transcode information from one format to another, and wander in geography as well as in history. This gives rise to practices which might be referred to as “time-specific”, in response to the “site- specific” work of the 1960s.

http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2010/03/the-altermodern/

Apr 022010
 

I find myself agreeing with this passage by art-theorist-cum-Luddite Nicholas Bourriaud. Should I see a doctor?

This evolution can be seen in the way works are made: a new type of form is appearing, the journey-form, made of lines drawn both in space and time, materialising trajectories rather than destinations. The form of the work expresses a course, a wandering, rather than a fixed space-time.

Altermodern art is thus read as a hypertext; artists translate and transcode information from one format to another, and wander in geography as well as in history. This gives rise to practices which might be referred to as “time-specific”, in response to the “site- specific” work of the 1960s.

http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2010/03/the-altermodern/