I’m sure the author meant to justify TV’s endless parade of cliched storylines, but to me the article simply justified why I don’t own a TV. That said, his view of creativity is provocative and could spur an interesting art project.

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/zOPmDjsBCKA/ via Byline Let’s embrace the standard semantics of tropes found on TV and in film, says Wired’s Scott Brown. Let’s call it what it is: a programming language….

You’re looking at the source code of television writing itself, basically a TV genome map. Far from being a tedious cliché roster, it’s rapturously fascinating (arguably more so than many of the programs actually mentioned). Start with your favorite show….You’ll pull up a list of the tropes it contains, starting with the obvious (the Cowboy Cop, the Red Shirt marked for death) …the Captain Obvious, an authority figure who vocalizes stuff that doesn’t need saying; and the ever-popular Genre Blindness, where characters have clearly never seen the kind of TV show they’re in. (If they had, they wouldn’t be having sex in the woods with a killer on the loose.)

With any luck, I’ll be taking my grandchildren on visits to HomeStarRunner.com. “Kids,” I’ll say, “this is what I was spending my time watching back in the day.” “You mean, while you weren’t fixing the climate catastrophe?” they’ll ask. “Hush,” I’ll say, “and put your respirators back on. Strong Bad’s got a hilarious old-skool rap coming up, and you’re gonna need extra oxygen for the belly laugh.”

http://www.wired.com/magazine/2009/12/pl_scott_brown/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+wired%2Findex+%28Wired%3A+Index+3+%28Top+Stories+2%29%29&utm_content=Google+Reader

With any luck, I’ll be taking my grandchildren on visits to HomeStarRunner.com. “Kids,” I’ll say, “this is what I was spending my time watching back in the day.” “You mean, while you weren’t fixing the climate catastrophe?” they’ll ask. “Hush,” I’ll say, “and put your respirators back on. Strong Bad’s got a hilarious old-skool rap coming up, and you’re gonna need extra oxygen for the belly laugh.”

http://www.wired.com/magazine/2009/12/pl_scott_brown/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+wired%2Findex+%28Wired%3A+Index+3+%28Top+Stories+2%29%29&utm_content=Google+Reader

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With any luck, I’ll be taking my grandchildren on visits to HomeStarRunner.com. “Kids,” I’ll say, “this is what I was spending my time watching back in the day.” “You mean, while you weren’t fixing the climate catastrophe?” they’ll ask. “Hush,” I’ll say, “and put your respirators back on. Strong Bad’s got a hilarious old-skool rap coming up, and you’re gonna need extra oxygen for the belly laugh.”

http://www.wired.com/magazine/2009/12/pl_scott_brown/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+wired%2Findex+%28Wired%3A+Index+3+%28Top+Stories+2%29%29&utm_content=Google+Reader

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- Digital Storytelling: Community Empowerment (Ana Boa-Ventura, University of Texas – Austin) – Digital Storytelling: Re-Defining the Role of the Academic Library (Sherry Tuffin, Wayne State University) – Digital Storytelling: Purpose, Practice, and Potential (Jeff Watson, USC School of Cinematic Arts)

The Scholars ask questions such as: – What is digital storytelling and how is it different than non-digital storytelling? – Can mobile and ubiquitous computing change the game when it comes to who gets to tell stories and who doesn’t? How does it change storytelling itself? – How can librarians best archive and present digital stories and storytelling technologies? How are librarians both gatekeepers of stories, as well as storytellers? – How does an archive also produce a story? What does it mean for a librarian, museum curator, graphic artist, or blogger to be a storyteller?

We also have some amazing guest speakers lined up to visit the forum.

You are very warmly invited to join us: http://www.hastac.org/scholars

Anyone is welcome to register with HASTAC and join the conversation.

This is the last forum of 2009! Coming up in 2010: Forum on Race/Ethnicity/Diaspora, another forum on Gender/Sexuality/Queer media spaces. Many others are in the works. If you haven’t visited HASTAC recently, drop by for just a minute to see all of their amazing work. The Scholars this year are developing an amazing, thoughtful, diverse, and interesting community. It is incredibly inspiring.

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