Bell Random Penguin JurassicNew media provocateur John Bell remixes famous book covers to show what they would have looked like if this year’s big literary merger had chosen the name Random Penguin.

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Art History Textbook no PicturesAs reported in numerous outlets today, publishers at the Ontario College of Art and Design realized their art history book would have cost $800 if they secured the rights to every image. So they chose the nuclear option, replacing each illustration with a white square and instructions to look the photos up online.

Not to worry! This approach should work fine for artworks like Kasimir Malevich’s White On White, or Robert Rauschenberg’s White Paintings or Erased De Kooning Drawing.

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This month’s debut of Apple’s digital textbook venture met with mixed reactions. Who’s right?

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Pocos Blue medRichard Rinehart, co-author with Still Water’s Jon Ippolito of the forthcoming MIT book New Media and Social Memory, presents conclusions from the book at the POCOS/HATII symposium on Software Art in Glasgow on 11 October.

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Why lose $20 reselling that engineering book or Shakespeare reader, when you can pay Amazon $5 and keep your notes in the cloud when you’re done?

Amazon Lets Students Rent Digital Textbooks http://news.slashdot.org/story/11/07/18/1654246/Amazon-Lets-Students-Rent-Digital-Textbooks

“Amazon has unveiled a new digital textbook rental service, allowing students to choose how long they’d like access to an eBook-version of a textbook via their Kindle or app — with the retailer claiming savings as high as 80%. Kindle Textbook Rental will let students use a text for between 30 and 360 days, adding extra days as they need to. Any notes or highlighted text will be saved via the Amazon Cloud for students to reference after the book is ‘returned.’ Amazon said tens of thousands of books would be available to rent for the next school year.”

While iPads have been getting the headlines, there are plenty more e-readers to choose from.

Study This: E-Textbook Readers Compared

The iPad was supposed to wipe out standalone e-readers, but they’re still here, and they’re a big deal on campus.

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/koZon8SFfJA/

Two days after Aaron Swartz is accused of downloading a huge swath of academic journal articles from the paywalled site JSTOR, another activist has posted a similar trove to the notorious Web site Pirate Bay. What happens when academics espouse plagiarism?

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If you haven’t already bought this term’d textbooks, here are a dozen sites ready to sell them cheap.

http://feeds.nytimes.com/click.phdo?i=868bf541f0ff969aa049c14b9bdf7534 via Byline A look at the long list of Web sites that help college students find the cheapest textbooks available.

Feel guilty about stuffing all that giftwrapping in the trash? Stuff it in the garden instead, thanks to these examples of growable packaging.

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Writing in the Atlantic, Dylan Tweney claims that online publishing is challenging designers to give up the control they were used to in print publications and even in the first decade of the Web. According to Tweney, software like Cascading Style Sheets and JavaScript and platforms like the iPad are enabling the separation of form and content like never before.

At the same time, designers are increasingly in demand to find efficient ways to convey people and information, as some recent remarkable examples of design make clear. So who’s right?

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Most students just “rent” textbooks anyway, so why not rent them digitally?

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/ifElS7LIESQ/ via Byline With the rise of tablets and e-readers, software developers and textbook publishers are making yet another effort to take textbooks digital. The latest entrant is Inkling, a textbook app for the iPad.

mongoliadFamed science fiction author Neal Stephenson has unveiled a digital novel platform created with a cabal of interactive fiction / martial arts enthusiasts. To judge from initial glimpses of their first interactive novel, The Mongoliad, this “new” platform is more of a combination of older ideas: part interactive CD-ROM (Voyager in the 1980s), part paid subscription (the New York Times in the 1990s), and part user-generated content (Wikipedia in the 2000s). At least the authors have given up on DRM from the get-go.

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I’m not making that title up–it’s a book about how the stuff we buy ends up under our skin, quite literally:

Over a four-day period, our intrepid (and perhaps foolhardy) authors ingest and inhale a host of things that surround us all every day, all of which are suspected of being toxic and posing long term health risks to humans. By revealing the pollution load in their bodies before and after the experiment – and the results in most cases are downright frightening – they tell the inside story of seven common substances.

I’m not making that title up–it’s a book about how the stuff we buy ends up under our skin, quite literally:

Over a four-day period, our intrepid (and perhaps foolhardy) authors ingest and inhale a host of things that surround us all every day, all of which are suspected of being toxic and posing long term health risks to humans. By revealing the pollution load in their bodies before and after the experiment – and the results in most cases are downright frightening – they tell the inside story of seven common substances.

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I’m not making that title up–it’s a book about how the stuff we buy ends up under our skin, quite literally:

Over a four-day period, our intrepid (and perhaps foolhardy) authors ingest and inhale a host of things that surround us all every day, all of which are suspected of being toxic and posing long term health risks to humans. By revealing the pollution load in their bodies before and after the experiment – and the results in most cases are downright frightening – they tell the inside story of seven common substances.

http://slowdeathbyrubberduck.com/ (via Vanessa Vobis)

network, sharing, software, Orono, library

If you like the idea, email Deborah Rollins on First Class to ask her to extend the free trial beyond the spring.

Personally, though, I think the title “Windows for Dummies” is redundant. *ducks*

Fogler Library is pleased to provide a 6-month trial to Safari Tech Books Online at

http://www.library.umaine.edu/indexesdb/Indexes.asp

The database has approximately 3,000 full-text IT titles on topics including certification, enterprise computing, Java, Linus/Unix, Web development, Windows, XML, and more. Publishers include O’Reilly Media Inc., Pearson Technology Group, Adobe, Idea Group, Sams, Wiley “For Dummies” books, and many more. Because there is a limit of 2 simultaneous users, please click “Sign Out & Clear Session” when done using the database. Fogler Library’s trial subscription expires June 30, 2010.

For assistance using the database, please contact Reference (581-1673) or Science & Engineering (581-1691).

http://www.library.umaine.edu/librarynews

network, sharing, software, Orono, library

If you like the idea, email Deborah Rollins on First Class to ask her to extend the free trial beyond the spring.

Personally, though, I think the title “Windows for Dummies” is redundant. *ducks*

Fogler Library is pleased to provide a 6-month trial to Safari Tech Books Online at

http://www.library.umaine.edu/indexesdb/Indexes.asp

The database has approximately 3,000 full-text IT titles on topics including certification, enterprise computing, Java, Linus/Unix, Web development, Windows, XML, and more. Publishers include O’Reilly Media Inc., Pearson Technology Group, Adobe, Idea Group, Sams, Wiley “For Dummies” books, and many more. Because there is a limit of 2 simultaneous users, please click “Sign Out & Clear Session” when done using the database. Fogler Library’s trial subscription expires June 30, 2010.

For assistance using the database, please contact Reference (581-1673) or Science & Engineering (581-1691).

http://www.library.umaine.edu/librarynews

If you like the idea, email Deborah Rollins on First Class to ask her to extend the free trial beyond the spring.

Personally, though, I think the title “Windows for Dummies” is redundant. *ducks*

Fogler Library is pleased to provide a 6-month trial to Safari Tech Books Online at

http://www.library.umaine.edu/indexesdb/Indexes.asp

The database has approximately 3,000 full-text IT titles on topics including certification, enterprise computing, Java, Linus/Unix, Web development, Windows, XML, and more. Publishers include O’Reilly Media Inc., Pearson Technology Group, Adobe, Idea Group, Sams, Wiley “For Dummies” books, and many more. Because there is a limit of 2 simultaneous users, please click “Sign Out & Clear Session” when done using the database. Fogler Library’s trial subscription expires June 30, 2010.

For assistance using the database, please contact Reference (581-1673) or Science & Engineering (581-1691).

http://www.library.umaine.edu/librarynews

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