Art History Textbook no PicturesAs reported in numerous outlets today, publishers at the Ontario College of Art and Design realized their art history book would have cost $800 if they secured the rights to every image. So they chose the nuclear option, replacing each illustration with a white square and instructions to look the photos up online.

Not to worry! This approach should work fine for artworks like Kasimir Malevich’s White On White, or Robert Rauschenberg’s White Paintings or Erased De Kooning Drawing.

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3dThe third dimension isn’t just a Hollywood contrivance for repackaging old movies–it’s cropping up in everything from tablet computers to museum exhibits to Web design.

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Pocos Blue medRichard Rinehart, co-author with Still Water’s Jon Ippolito of the forthcoming MIT book New Media and Social Memory, presents conclusions from the book at the POCOS/HATII symposium on Software Art in Glasgow on 11 October.

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Cheap “fabbers” and easy-to-use photo-conversion software make 3d art, medical models of organs, even a working plane. Is 3d fabrication finally taking off?

Since Photofly, a service that turns uploaded photos into three-dimensional models, was introduced in May, it has received an average of 80 uploads an hour, for a total of 70,000 images, according to Autodesk, the service’s creator….

Among the dozens of videos of 3-D models on the site are representations of stuffed animals (like Eeyore), battleships, Lego men, kitchen tables, fruit dishes, remote controls, vacation souvenirs, crab arms, Nerf guns, sneakers and remote controls. If anything, it’s notable how mundane the objects are, an indication of how easy this modeling process — once mainly the purview of laser scanners — has become.

Like Microsoft’s Photosynth service, Photofly stitches together images using stereo photogrammetry, using visual cues to reverse-engineer the geometric properties of objects. But Photofly also creates 3-D object files in various formats that can be imported into computer-aided design programs. Thus the images can be printed, reproduced, manipulated and mixed with other 3-D models. In other words, the scene from Mission Impossible 3 where surreptitiously snapped photos of a villain are transformed into a mask of his face seems less remote….

Photofly’s 3-D models can be made with as few as five photos, though the service recommends that users take at least one photo for every 10 degrees of perspective they want to cover….

Originally, the Photofly researchers thought professionals would be the main users, said Brian Mathews, a vice president at Autodesk who oversees Photofly, as there are already 150 or so industries that Autodesk works with. They saw it being used for things like architecture and the preservation of aging artifacts.

But users have come up with an ever-expanding set of applications. One forensic investigator is testing to see if the technology can be used for crime-scene investigations (here is a model of a footprint in the snow). Another designer imported computer models he had created and combined them with ones scanned by Photofly to create a hybrid reality scene.

http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/07/14/photofly-brings-3-d-models-to-the-masses/

Now made easier thanks to cheaper printers:

3-D Plastic Art for the Masses: Ready to Print

A Brooklyn company sells consumer-grade 3-D printers and preaches an open-source mantra, empowering artists and creative aspirants.

A new economy?

Already, 3D printing has been used to make tools and artworks, custom-fitted prosthetics for amputees, components for aviation and medical instruments, solid medical models of bones and organs based on MRI scans, paper-based photovoltaic cells, and the body panels for a lightweight hybrid automobile.

http://tech.slashdot.org/story/11/08/01/1723212/3D-Printing-and-the-Replicator-Economy

oh, and a plane:

“It was printed on an EOS EOSINT P730 nylon laser sintering machine, which fabricates plastic or metal objects, building up the item layer by layer. No fasteners were used and all equipment was attached using ‘snap fit’ techniques so that the entire aircraft can be put together without tools in minutes. The electric-powered aircraft, with a 2-meter wingspan, has a top speed of nearly 100 miles per hour, but when in cruise mode is almost silent.

http://tech.slashdot.org/story/11/07/30/1832201/Aircraft-Made-From-3D-Printing

Anonymous video artists have projected onto the Maine State House the mural by artist Judy Taylor originally installed to commemorate Maine’s labor history. The mural’s removal by Maine’s new governor Paul LePage has provoked outcries of censorship from artists and educators.

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LACE’s archives are an invaluable site of cultural history for Los Angeles, as LACE has been a crucial participant in the city’s artistic production for over three decades, often housing artwork that is experimental in nature. This LACE Archives Internship is an opportunity to work with LACE’s unique collections, which include documentation of art exhibitions and performances held at LACE since 1978, extensive holdings of photographic and video material and records pertaining to the institution’s history.

The LACE Archives Internship will provide an interested individual with the opportunity to gain training and experience working with archival collections. In addition to providing training in widely held standards and protocol of collections management, it also offers a unique introduction to working with collections related to experimental and variable media art. The Archives Intern will: – Learn first-hand about collections-management issues and make use of an extensive database specifically designed by Franklin Furnace Archive to meet the needs of collections of conceptual and other variable media art; – Learn about ways that archival collections are made publicly accessible and work with the LACE Archives Fellow to integrate the catalogue of LACE’s holdings into searchable online databases; – Process a variety of material from LACE’s recent exhibitions and events (e.g. photographs, video, press clippings, correspondence), attending to preservation concerns and updating the archives database as needed; – Respond to research inquiries about LACE’s archive and facilitate the use of collections by LACE staff members and visiting scholars and artists; – Digitize selected items from LACE’s collections, including videos, slides and printed matter; – Work with the LACE Archives Fellow to develop online resources that will provide broad access to, and contextualization of LACE’s digitized collections, including project-specific and thematic websites; – Think creatively about how to generate broad interest in LACE’s archival collections; and – Serve as a liaison with LACE’s webmaster to facilitate the integration of documents from the archive into LACE’s website. Application instructions: Send a resume, references, and a cover letter explaining the reasons for your interest in this position to: Jennifer Flores Sternad at jennifer [AT] welcometolace [DOT] org

LACE internships require a commitment of approx. 16 hours per week for a minimum of three months. For further information, please contact Jennifer via e-mail or at (323) 957-1777 x 11. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

http://www.idealist.org/if/i/en/av/Internship/150335-235

LACE’s archives are an invaluable site of cultural history for Los Angeles, as LACE has been a crucial participant in the city’s artistic production for over three decades, often housing artwork that is experimental in nature. This LACE Archives Internship is an opportunity to work with LACE’s unique collections, which include documentation of art exhibitions and performances held at LACE since 1978, extensive holdings of photographic and video material and records pertaining to the institution’s history.

The LACE Archives Internship will provide an interested individual with the opportunity to gain training and experience working with archival collections. In addition to providing training in widely held standards and protocol of collections management, it also offers a unique introduction to working with collections related to experimental and variable media art. The Archives Intern will: – Learn first-hand about collections-management issues and make use of an extensive database specifically designed by Franklin Furnace Archive to meet the needs of collections of conceptual and other variable media art; – Learn about ways that archival collections are made publicly accessible and work with the LACE Archives Fellow to integrate the catalogue of LACE’s holdings into searchable online databases; – Process a variety of material from LACE’s recent exhibitions and events (e.g. photographs, video, press clippings, correspondence), attending to preservation concerns and updating the archives database as needed; – Respond to research inquiries about LACE’s archive and facilitate the use of collections by LACE staff members and visiting scholars and artists; – Digitize selected items from LACE’s collections, including videos, slides and printed matter; – Work with the LACE Archives Fellow to develop online resources that will provide broad access to, and contextualization of LACE’s digitized collections, including project-specific and thematic websites; – Think creatively about how to generate broad interest in LACE’s archival collections; and – Serve as a liaison with LACE’s webmaster to facilitate the integration of documents from the archive into LACE’s website. Application instructions: Send a resume, references, and a cover letter explaining the reasons for your interest in this position to: Jennifer Flores Sternad at jennifer [AT] welcometolace [DOT] org

LACE internships require a commitment of approx. 16 hours per week for a minimum of three months. For further information, please contact Jennifer via e-mail or at (323) 957-1777 x 11. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

http://www.idealist.org/if/i/en/av/Internship/150335-235

The first in a series of reports from Montreal’s DOCAM conference on preserving art endangered by technological or cultural obsolescence. What’s going to kill off your installation? Analog media–analog TV signals, video projectors, and even food–are probably the fastest poison.

More…

This isn’t the first we’ve heard of this, but a very public instance: UCLA professors can no longer post videos on their educational media server.  Copyright refugees can find a home at Critical Commons, a resource developed by Steve Anderson and Holly Willis from cross-town USC for media-based teaching and research. The site promotes media uploads under fair-use with scholarly examinations of each work.

Video artist Gary Hill once responded to the question of how his work should be displayed when CRTs became obsolete with the suggestion that his video should be projected on his viewers’ bodies from inside their skin.

When Hill was participating in the TechArcheology workshops a decade ago, this suggestion sounded flippant (and was perhaps meant to be). But now mainstream science has caught up with this nutty vision, and it looks like the porn industry won’t be far behind.

So what happens when your LED tattoo goes obsolete? Microsoft customers had better be diligent about downloading the latest “patches,” or they’ll end up sporting the Blue Skin of Death.

Conservation programs of museums are far removed from the “proliferative preservation” of digital creators.

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