3d Printed gunA rundown of stuff you can now make with 3d printers includes eagle’s beaks (there’s an eagle wearing one now), Escher buildings, the world’s fastest shoe, iPhone cases, and yes, pistols.

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CorvetteSummer may be over, but there’s still time to get some action footage while the weather’s nice. Wired reviews your options for point-of-view cameras–and yes, shows an electric skateboard holding its own against a Corvette.

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Flickr FTW; Facebook WTF.

The Flickr circles you draw on your map are refreshingly intuitive.

Flickr, the granddaddy of online photo sharing, has introduced some refreshingly simple privacy controls designed to limit who can see where your photos were taken. Facebook, please start your photocopiers.

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/KZ2MRAa0E7E/

Sadly, Facebook seems to have botched its approach to privacy yet again.

Blogger Dan Tynan was one of the recipients of the new privacy controls that Facebook promised last week. The bad news: They still don’t work, and may even be worse than before. ‘Using Facebook’s new improved privacy controls, you can tag someone else in photo and then keep them from seeing it,’ says Tynan. ‘It’s pretty simple; just change the sharing option so they don’t see what you posted. So if you want to tag a picture of some jerk with your friend’s name on it and make it Public, everyone on Facebook will be able to see it except one — the person whose name is on it.

http://yro.slashdot.org/story/11/08/29/1644259/Facebooks-New-Privacy-Controls-Still-Broken

Cheap “fabbers” and easy-to-use photo-conversion software make 3d art, medical models of organs, even a working plane. Is 3d fabrication finally taking off?

Since Photofly, a service that turns uploaded photos into three-dimensional models, was introduced in May, it has received an average of 80 uploads an hour, for a total of 70,000 images, according to Autodesk, the service’s creator….

Among the dozens of videos of 3-D models on the site are representations of stuffed animals (like Eeyore), battleships, Lego men, kitchen tables, fruit dishes, remote controls, vacation souvenirs, crab arms, Nerf guns, sneakers and remote controls. If anything, it’s notable how mundane the objects are, an indication of how easy this modeling process — once mainly the purview of laser scanners — has become.

Like Microsoft’s Photosynth service, Photofly stitches together images using stereo photogrammetry, using visual cues to reverse-engineer the geometric properties of objects. But Photofly also creates 3-D object files in various formats that can be imported into computer-aided design programs. Thus the images can be printed, reproduced, manipulated and mixed with other 3-D models. In other words, the scene from Mission Impossible 3 where surreptitiously snapped photos of a villain are transformed into a mask of his face seems less remote….

Photofly’s 3-D models can be made with as few as five photos, though the service recommends that users take at least one photo for every 10 degrees of perspective they want to cover….

Originally, the Photofly researchers thought professionals would be the main users, said Brian Mathews, a vice president at Autodesk who oversees Photofly, as there are already 150 or so industries that Autodesk works with. They saw it being used for things like architecture and the preservation of aging artifacts.

But users have come up with an ever-expanding set of applications. One forensic investigator is testing to see if the technology can be used for crime-scene investigations (here is a model of a footprint in the snow). Another designer imported computer models he had created and combined them with ones scanned by Photofly to create a hybrid reality scene.

http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/07/14/photofly-brings-3-d-models-to-the-masses/

Now made easier thanks to cheaper printers:

3-D Plastic Art for the Masses: Ready to Print

A Brooklyn company sells consumer-grade 3-D printers and preaches an open-source mantra, empowering artists and creative aspirants.

A new economy?

Already, 3D printing has been used to make tools and artworks, custom-fitted prosthetics for amputees, components for aviation and medical instruments, solid medical models of bones and organs based on MRI scans, paper-based photovoltaic cells, and the body panels for a lightweight hybrid automobile.

http://tech.slashdot.org/story/11/08/01/1723212/3D-Printing-and-the-Replicator-Economy

oh, and a plane:

“It was printed on an EOS EOSINT P730 nylon laser sintering machine, which fabricates plastic or metal objects, building up the item layer by layer. No fasteners were used and all equipment was attached using ‘snap fit’ techniques so that the entire aircraft can be put together without tools in minutes. The electric-powered aircraft, with a 2-meter wingspan, has a top speed of nearly 100 miles per hour, but when in cruise mode is almost silent.

http://tech.slashdot.org/story/11/07/30/1832201/Aircraft-Made-From-3D-Printing

Is it cheating to appropriate Google Street View images as photojournalism?

The Google Street View car is like the ultimate street photographer, a robo Cartier-Bresson methodically scouring the streets and documenting what it sees. But most people use GSV for practical purposes, and they view any drama or comedy captured by the roving 360-degree camera as accidents.

A few photographers are now looking for these ‘accidents’ intentionally. Instead of walking out on the street to find interesting scenes and people, they are simply curating the pre-documented streets from the comfort of their desk at home.

Michael Wolf, for example, uses a camera to photograph scenes from Google Street View open on his computer’s browser. In February, his honorable mention in the Contemporary Issues category at the World Press Photo Awards for A Series of Unfortunate Events ignited a storm of debate. Some balked at the idea that Wolf’s project was photojournalism, while others embraced the decision and called for more conceptual leaps and redefinitions of photojournalism in the digital age.

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/LomrdS9rJDQ/

Meanwhile two women in Cincinnati are testing privacy ethics by selling reproductions of 1955 police mug shots.

http://feeds.nytimes.com/click.phdo?i=78417df2d428dc4bffb906cc42a4bc53

On another mobile front: For those who prefer their art fresh rather than refried, tablet drawing is getting more sophisticated, as on this recent release by the same company that created AutoCAD:

SketchBook Pro, essentially a digital canvas and brush set, allows you to use both your fingers and aftermarket styluses to create illustrations and designs. Included are over 60 different brush tools, the ability to create up to six different layers for one file, as well as the ability to export files to Photoshop.

The app was previously available on iPhone, iPad and Android phone devices, as well as in an expanded desktop version. This is the first version of the app that will run on Android’s tablet-optimized software, a.k.a. Honeycomb.

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/mhaWdgu5zMY/

Of course, just because you drew it on an iPad doesn’t mean you won’t be a kitschy derivative of other works–as demonstrated by a recent exhibition that showed off the iPad’s artsy side:

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/aX5h2ZGYt9E/

What would Leonardo do?

Camera Article LargeWith the Lytro camera, it’s shoot first, focus later, thanks to a special sensor and software that lets users change the focus on the file itself. These interactive demos suggests how this can add a new dimension of interactivity to otherwise ordinary photographs.

Meanwhile, for moving image mavens, Apple’s Final Cut is reborn at a third the price. Not everyone is pleased with its reincarnation, but most are sure to like the biggest difference: no more waiting for rendering. Yes, you heard that right.

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At the same time that the Obama administration is underwriting hardware for helping citizens of other countries circumvent their own government’s Internet censorship, Apple is patenting a camera that performs a government’s censorship for it.

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How do photojournalists get paid if their traditional business model is drying up? A story from the front lines of crowdfunding, plus a photographer applies a technique from a New Media capstone to traverse the Appalachian Trail in four minutes.

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/89mLw4IOQdY/ via Byline

A month after the launch of the new crowd-funding platform for photojournalism, Emphas.is, one of its users reports from the road. Belgian photographer and Emphas.is fundraiser Tomas van Houtryve tells us about the good, the bad and the future of a work in progress….

The pressure of time has been the hardest challenge for van Houtryve, “I would not recommend tight schedules where one has to juggle shooting, fundraising and a withering travel schedule. It’s been very intense keeping all the elements on track.”

Despite travails, van Houtryve sees a lot of promise. “It’s an intuitive model,” he says. “Backers have started to pose relevant questions. As my project proposal has made its way through social networks and attracted support from strangers, I’ve made some really fruitful new connections. In addition to generous funding contributions, several individuals have stepped forward with key contacts and very precise and helpful advice. I have already managed to make stronger photos due to their input. This is a pleasant shift over the lone-wolf existence.”

Meanwhile, on the Appalachian Trail photographers are documenting their trek using a technique that sounds a lot like NMD alumnus Sam Lynch’s iGlasses:

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/uhDLuMVI0AM/ via Byline

Kevin Gallagher spent six months hiking the 2,200 miles of the Appalachian Trail. Then he compiled his 4,000 still photos taken along the way and turned them into an amazing 4-minute video travelog.

Hmmmm, this sounds familiar…

http://ces.cnet.com/8301-32254_1-20027721-283.html (January 7, 2011)
The super-stylish GL20 Camera Glasses contain a camera and 1.5-inch OLED screens that can capture and display images and video to people around you.

The GL20 shades have a USB key in the earpiece so imagery can be transferred to a computer and uploaded to the Internet. The shades will be released later this year at an unspecified price.

A veiled, black-clad Lady Gaga, Polaroid’s creative director, demoed a prototype of the specs on a mannequin, calling the shades the first of their kind.

http://theiglasses.com/ (April 2010)

The iGlasses are a hands free camera located in a pair of sunglasses. They are designed for users who find themselves moving around too much to stop and take pictures.

The glasses can take up to 1,200 1.3 mega pixel photographs over the course of 8 hours. The photographs are automatically streamed online to Flickr when plugged in to a computer via USB.

Obviously they are a little different. Her glasses incorporated a portable printer, and are “super-stylish”

Lady Gaga Camera Glasses
The iGlasses

Kinect eye-viewFacebook quietly rolled out face recognition in its photo service earlier this year, prompting some to speculate that Facebook users might soon get ads correlated to what they look like or where their pictures appear. But Facebook may not be the only one targeting ads according to what the lens sees. Last month Microsoft’s Chief Financial Officer for interactive entertainment let slip that Kinect’s camera feed offered his company “a bunch of new business opportunities.”

What sort of business opportunities? Well, once their system is trained on actual faces thanks to tags from its own users, Microsoft or Facebook could sell Haar classifiers to other companies for ad targeting (think X-box ads for acne cream) or the government for surveillance (think a “Total Information Awareness” database of every person ever caught on a security camera).

Of course, as new media artist and innovator Mark Daggett pointed out to me, this face-harvesting could have productive applications, such as an iPhone app that scans a crowd and displays each person’s Facebook profile above their heads. Then again, it could have detrimental applications, such as an iPhone app that scans a crowd and displays each person’s Facebook profile above their heads.

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A new grant for socially conscious photographers could make a dream documentary project a reality for one lucky applicant.

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/Oe0FRw1k-_Y/

A new grant for socially conscious photographers could make a dream documentary project a reality for one lucky applicant.

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/Oe0FRw1k-_Y/

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A new grant for socially conscious photographers could make a dream documentary project a reality for one lucky applicant.

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/Oe0FRw1k-_Y/

#img1#This article from the New York Times discusses forensic photogrammetry, a way of analysing crime scenes with techniques familiar from 3D modelling. So if that job as a game animator falls through, there’s always CSI…

img1 caption=’Image from the New York Times’

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#img1#This article from the New York Times discusses forensic photogrammetry, a way of analysing crime scenes with techniques familiar from 3D modelling. So if that job as a game animator falls through, there’s always CSI…

img1 caption=’Image from the New York Times’

>

Bookmark this category

This article from the New York Times discusses forensic photogrammetry, a way of analysing crime scenes with techniques familiar from 3D modelling. So if that job as a game animator falls through, there’s always CSI…

Image from the New York Times

NYT-ForensicPhotogrammetry

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