Francis Ford Coppola may be best known for directing blockbusters like The Godfather and Apocalypse Now, but he’s giving over control of his latest flick to a digital DJ.

While Coppola’s remixable film may sound outlandish to some, in new media circles it’s almost old hat. Mike Figgis remixed his 2000 film Timecode–already unusual for its four screens of the same footage shot in one take with no editing–live at the 2006 Zero One festival curated by Steve Dietz. And a self-remixing film has been the subject of a number of U-Me capstones.

Timecode (2000) Four cameras. One take. No edits. Real time. http://m.imdb.com/title/tt0220100

Compare Twixt:

Coppola turned members of the Hall H crowd into test subjects for his wild idea to turn movies into live entertainment. Accompanied onstage by musician Dan Deacon and actor Val Kilmer, Coppola used a touchpad to select scenes from Twixt on the fly as Deacon tweaked the soundtrack.

Coppola said Twixt was conceived as a way to inject a live feel into cinema.

“What I’d love to do is go on tour,” he said, “like a month before the film opened, and go to all the cities myself, with my collaborators, with live music and actually perform the film for each audience uniquely for them — a different version for each audience. That’s what opera was like.”

Twixt centers on a horror writer who stumbles onto strange goings-on, and maybe vampires, in a small town. During one segment screened Saturday, the writer, played by Val Kilmer, brainstorms alone in his hotel room. Coppola and his tech crew spliced together different mixes of the montage, during which Kilmer assumed various personas.

“Theoretically, I could push the Shuffle button,” Coppola said.

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/uSwOEiYQREI/

DIY couture may not yet have hit the runways in Milan and Paris, but it’s alive and well in new media circles.

For her performance Cast, U-Me Intermedia MFA student Amy Pierce didn’t make her own wedding dress as much as invite others to make it for her. Her choice of material–a plaster body cast that required her to stand motionless for four hours–was a metaphor for the marriage contract that was particularly, well, “fitting.” (Like any good bride, she eventually fainted.)

Meanwhile designer Mary Huang has developed an application that turns drawings into dresses, courtesy of a handy mathematical algorithm.

http://idle.slashdot.org/story/11/03/24/1157201/An-App-That-Turns-Any-Drawing-Into-a-Dress?from=rss via Byline

“A new app by interactive designer Mary Huang called Continuum, lets you turn any drawing into a customized three-dimensional garment. From the article: ‘Huang dubs her software “D. dress”—the “D” stands for “Delaunay triangulation,” an algorithm she uses to deconstruct each dress into a series of triangular planes. Any adjustments in necklines, skirt lengths, or sleeve types are achieved by adding or subtracting triangles. “Lo-res triangular models are more abstract,” Huang admits, “but this abstraction prompts people to imagine what the resulting dress would look like rather than expect an exact rendition of the screen image. The triangulation also insures that almost any drawing will produce an interesting form.”’”

Some people will do anything to pass NMD102. At least when Variable Media students recreated Pacman in the university parking lot, no one ended up in the hospital ;)

http://games.slashdot.org/story/10/12/29/2312254/Real-Life-emFroggerem-Ends-In-Hospital-Visit?from=rss

BigSes writes “A 23-year old man has been hospitalized after police in South Carolina say he was hit by an SUV while playing a real-life version of the video game Frogger. Authorities said the 23-year-old man was taken to a hospital in Anderson after he was struck Monday evening. Before he was hit, police say the man had been discussing the game with his friends. Chief Jimmy Dixon says the man yelled ‘go’ and darted into oncoming traffic in the four-lane highway. Has it come time to ban some of the classics before someone else goes out and breaks a few bricks with their heads after eating a large mushroom?”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

I’m a big fan of the John Cage | Fluxus Happening | guerilla urban architecture mashup Frozen Grand Central. I’m also a fan of public transportation. So you can imagine my delight when I stepped off the metro at UCLA’s Westwood & La Conte and stumbled upon this:
Continue reading »

Screen shot 2010-04-24 at 12.46.51 PMOur company of actors and chefs will be arriving in the form of an alchemical laboratory that engages all of one’s senses through a media-rich exploration of food, music, video and theatrical performances. The University of Maine’s new Intermedia Graduate program will be launching a revolutionary collaborative effort, under the guidance of Professor Leon Johnson, where graduate students engage as designers, authors, performers, with a range of communities, to cultivate conversations with local artists, farmers, students, teachers and businesses to generate a uniquely immersive dining experience.

Guests will enter into a bubbling laboratory, rich with history beyond our time, as wandering scientists of questionable origin stop to observe the local inhabitants. Supported by a backdrop of music, video, custom designed sets, original script, an eclectic cast of characters, and a multi-course dinner prepared live from the finest local produce, the project looks to activate as many local artisans as possible. Collaborative efforts have already begun between the team of students and several artists and venues, and all are looking forward to the launch in April.

The students hope to demonstrate that this nomadic structure based on conversations with local communities around convivial spaces can become a sustainable architecture for artists and farmers alike. The collaborative model looks to activate new models of learning and engagement in the world that stimulate conversations that can carry on beyond the scope of a single project, generating opportunity and awareness for a host of groups and individuals throughout numerous communities. The theater will serve doubly as a mobile art gallery, as all artifacts that comprise the set will be custom designed artworks created specifically for that evening’s performance. From photography to furniture making and cooking, artisans of all types are encouraged to participate in this model. For more information on joining us as a guest or a collaborator in a dining experience like no other, please feel free to contact us.

Performance Dates May 5th, 6th, 7th
For Ticket Information, Please Contact [email protected]

relationships, space, architecture, intermedia

#imag1#Ward Shelley is an artist who creates architectural constraints (“Stability”, “Flatland”) that confine performers to negotiate together a shared space. It’s a great example of how you can investigate new forms of social interaction with pulleys and rebar instead of computers and Web sites.

They’re reminiscent of MTAA’s 1-Year Performance Project (hosted by U- Me)–or better yet, life in a submarine.

http://www.wardshelley.com/

relationships, space, architecture, intermedia

#imag1#Ward Shelley is an artist who creates architectural constraints (“Stability”, “Flatland”) that confine performers to negotiate together a shared space. It’s a great example of how you can investigate new forms of social interaction with pulleys and rebar instead of computers and Web sites.

They’re reminiscent of MTAA’s 1-Year Performance Project (hosted by U- Me)–or better yet, life in a submarine.

http://www.wardshelley.com/

Ward Shelley is an artist who creates architectural constraints (“Stability”, “Flatland”) that confine performers to negotiate together a shared space. It’s a great example of how you can investigate new forms of social interaction with pulleys and rebar instead of computers and Web sites.

They’re reminiscent of MTAA’s 1-Year Performance Project (hosted by U- Me)–or better yet, life in a submarine.

http://www.wardshelley.com/

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