Feb 122011
 

Conspiracy theorists think this app could be used to detect drivers who pick up the phone to text, which is illegal on some states. But given the size of Maine’s potholes, it could also help locate cars that have disappeared into them.

http://apple.slashdot.org/story/11/02/10/0235239/Gov-App-Detects-Potholes-As-Your-Drive-Over-Them?from=rss via Byline An anonymous reader writes “The City of Boston has released an app that uses the accelerometer in your smartphone to automatically report bumps in the road as you drive over them. From the article: ‘The application relies on two components embedded in iPhones, Android phones, and many other mobile devices: the accelerometer and the Global Positioning System receiver. The accelerometer, which determines the direction and acceleration of a phone’s movement, can be harnessed to identify when a phone resting on a dashboard or in a cupholder in a moving car has hit a bump; the GPS receiver can determine by satellite just where that bump is located.’ I am certain that this will not be used to track your movements, unless they are vertical.”

Sep 072010
 

mongoliadFamed science fiction author Neal Stephenson has unveiled a digital novel platform created with a cabal of interactive fiction / martial arts enthusiasts. To judge from initial glimpses of their first interactive novel, The Mongoliad, this “new” platform is more of a combination of older ideas: part interactive CD-ROM (Voyager in the 1980s), part paid subscription (the New York Times in the 1990s), and part user-generated content (Wikipedia in the 2000s). At least the authors have given up on DRM from the get-go.

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Aug 262010
 

Two bits of good news for anyone who wants to start a simple location-based game: 1) SCVNGR offers a readymade tool for creating one; and 2) you’ll have little competition, as all the games made so far sound moronic.

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/_ved4fNYzJo/ via Byline SCVNGR is a location-based gaming platform for mobile phones that has been used in alternate-reality games for campaigns ranging from the New England Patriots to Dexter. They scored $4 million in venture capital late last year. In this article, Jane Doh takes an in-depth look at this helpful tool for puzzle designers looking for a more local flavor….

SCVNGR tasks might be a riddle, a dare, a question, or more, and they are customized precisely for the location. For example, I checked in to my nearby police precinct (No, I was not in handcuffs), and, in addition to the usual “Say something here” functionality common to the other geo-location smartphone games, SCVNGR offered me a few tasks related to law enforcement. It asked me what my favorite constitutional amendment was (Duh, the Fifth!), and in “The Swords & Scales” challenge I was asked to pose as Lady Justice and upload the picture. (Hm, yes well, the zip ties were a problem.)

Aug 212010
 

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/Sz72MmtSvMQ/ via Byline This New York bike sharing startup uses GPS and wireless technology to make finding and reserving a bicycle as easy as using a smartphone….

SoBi doesn’t use cycle stations; the bikes are parked throughout the city (starting in New York) at regular racks. Bikes could, in fact, be anywhere at any given time, not just at a designated station that could be blocks away. Users can grab any bike that isn’t already reserved and drop it off anywhere. No need to search for a drop-off station.

Like a Zipcar, each SoBi bike has its own “lockbox” (shown above) that communicates wirelessly with SoBi servers via GPS and a cellular receiver (an H-24 module from Motorola). When you make a reservation online or via smartphone, a map displays all the bikes in the area and gives you the option of unlocking a specific bike by clicking on it.

Aug 212010
 

http://feeds.nytimes.com/click.phdo?i=dc5d41dd3901e39f763a0f16e9afa2c3 via Byline The Android App Inventor from Google is intended to help nontechnical types create their own apps. An intrepid explorer plunges into do-it-yourself territory….

Truth is, Android App Inventor is only the latest in a long line of “programming for the rest of us” kits: HyperCard, Automator, Scratch and so on. Each, at its debut, was hailed as a breakthrough. Each promised the dawn of a new era. And not a single one wound up delivering the idiot-proof, drag-and-drop software-creation process they promised. It may well be that “programming for nonprogrammers” is simply an oxymoron.

Aug 052010
 

Flash and 3d vector overlays would seem to be a no brainer for the AR market. If Adobe had pushed this out the door sooner it might have contributed pressure on Apple to enable Flash on its handhelds.

http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2010/07/augmented-reality-earthmine-sdk-for-flash/

“The earthmine SDK for Flash provides developers with the ability to create immersive, detailed, and spatially accurate street level 3D experiences using the Adobe Flash, Flex and AIR frameworks providing for a variety of deployment options. Create and display contextually relevant information about places by attaching overlays to real-world objects and features in 3D space.”

Jul 262010
 

Several NMD courses at U-Me this fall will be using iPads–though I don’t believe it’s so much to read textbooks as reinvent them.

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/DSyc9zuJNsw/

The iPad is about to have its academic chops put to the test this fall in a number of programs around the country. Colleges and universities are looking to adopt the iPad as a collaborative tool, a standardized mobile device to integrate into curriculums, and, in some cases, even a cost-saving device.

Jul 262010
 

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Several NMD courses at U-Me this fall will be using iPads–though I don’t believe it’s so much to read textbooks as reinvent them.

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/DSyc9zuJNsw/

The iPad is about to have its academic chops put to the test this fall in a number of programs around the country. Colleges and universities are looking to adopt the iPad as a collaborative tool, a standardized mobile device to integrate into curriculums, and, in some cases, even a cost-saving device.

Jul 202010
 

Another DIY AR toolkit. I wonder if it comes with that sophisticated European accent built-in–it does vaguely sound computer-generated.

http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2010/07/augmented-reality-hoppala/ via Byline

*I do hope! they! get rid of! that exclamation point! soon.

“HOPPALA! Augmentation provides an easy way for non-technical creatives to start experimenting with augmented reality and Layar. Create your own augmented reality experiences with just some mouse clicks and publish your work at Layar, the world‘s largest augmented reality platform.

“HOPPALA! Augmentation comes with a full screen map interface to place and edit augments all around the world. Upload your images and icons, audio, video and 3D multimedia content with just some mouse clicks and add it to your personalized inventory in the cloud. HOPPALA! Augmentation even does the hosting for you. It simply runs in your browser, there’s no software installation required and no coding needed at all.

“HOPPALA! Augmentation is your perfect Layar companion. It offers a fullservice solution for producing augmented reality experiences and easily integrates with the Layar open platform. Create and maintain your content at HOPPALA! Augmentation and publish cross-platform at Layar. Layar is available for iPhone and Android smartphones with more than 2 mio. installations worldwide and preinstallations on 1 in 3 AR capable smartphones sold worldwide this year.

“Try HOPPALA! Augmentation for free and learn more about HOPPALA! Augmentation in our video tutorial.”

(((At least they didn’t name the enterprise “H0pp0la.” The thing I like best about Hoppola! (besides the fact that it makes AR accessible to bone-lazy dilettantes), is that it resembles an augmented reality system for building augmented realities. With “no software installation required and with no coding needed at all,” it may be a mere matter of time before we can augment reality by snapping our fingers at it.)))

Jul 202010
 

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Another DIY AR toolkit. I wonder if it comes with that sophisticated European accent built-in–it does vaguely sound computer-generated.

http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2010/07/augmented-reality-hoppala/ via Byline

*I do hope! they! get rid of! that exclamation point! soon.

“HOPPALA! Augmentation provides an easy way for non-technical creatives to start experimenting with augmented reality and Layar. Create your own augmented reality experiences with just some mouse clicks and publish your work at Layar, the world‘s largest augmented reality platform.

“HOPPALA! Augmentation comes with a full screen map interface to place and edit augments all around the world. Upload your images and icons, audio, video and 3D multimedia content with just some mouse clicks and add it to your personalized inventory in the cloud. HOPPALA! Augmentation even does the hosting for you. It simply runs in your browser, there’s no software installation required and no coding needed at all.

“HOPPALA! Augmentation is your perfect Layar companion. It offers a fullservice solution for producing augmented reality experiences and easily integrates with the Layar open platform. Create and maintain your content at HOPPALA! Augmentation and publish cross-platform at Layar. Layar is available for iPhone and Android smartphones with more than 2 mio. installations worldwide and preinstallations on 1 in 3 AR capable smartphones sold worldwide this year.

“Try HOPPALA! Augmentation for free and learn more about HOPPALA! Augmentation in our video tutorial.”

(((At least they didn’t name the enterprise “H0pp0la.” The thing I like best about Hoppola! (besides the fact that it makes AR accessible to bone-lazy dilettantes), is that it resembles an augmented reality system for building augmented realities. With “no software installation required and with no coding needed at all,” it may be a mere matter of time before we can augment reality by snapping our fingers at it.)))

Jul 122010
 

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Sure, it could lead to some crummy apps, but overall this is a big step toward making mobile devices about production as well as consumption.

theodp writes “Steve Jobs & Co. put the kibosh on easier cellphone development, but Google is giving it a shot. The NY Times reports that Google is bringing Android software development to the masses, offering a software tool starting Monday that’s intended to make it easy for people to write applications for its Android phones. The free software, called Google App Inventor for Android, has been under development for a year. User testing has been done mainly in schools with groups that included sixth graders, high school girls, nursing students and university undergraduates who are not CS majors. The thinking behind the initiative, Google said, is that as cellphones increasingly become the computers that people rely on most, users should be able to make applications themselves. It’s something Apple should be taking very seriously, advises TechCrunch.”

ttp://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/jx-nAU3mSsI/The-Android-Gets-Its-HyperCard via Byline

Jul 022010
 

Augmented politics, inspired by BP.

http://theleakinyourhometown.wordpress.com/

“the leak in your home town” is an iPhone app that lets users see the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill whenever they see a BP logo. A user simply launches the app and aims their iPhone’s camera at the nearest BP logo. What the user sees is one of the broken BP pipes coming out of the BP logo, and out of the pipe comes the oil, pluming upward.

“This work mixes computer generated 3D graphics with the iPhone’s video camera to create an augmented reality. The user is able to see the computer generated 3D objects at specific locations in the real world. The 3D graphics create the broken BP pipe which comes out of the BP logo.

“An important component of the project is that it uses BP’s corporate logo as a marker, to orient the computer-generated 3D graphics. Basically turning their own logo against them. This repurposing of corporate icons will offer future artists and activists a powerful means of expression which will be easily accessible to the masses and at the same time will be safe and nondestructive.”

“This project was created by Mark Skwarek and Joseph Hocking and is a work in progress.”

http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2010/06/augmented-reality-bp-logo-hack/

Jul 022010
 

Bookmark this category

Augmented politics, inspired by BP.

http://theleakinyourhometown.wordpress.com/

“the leak in your home town” is an iPhone app that lets users see the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill whenever they see a BP logo. A user simply launches the app and aims their iPhone’s camera at the nearest BP logo. What the user sees is one of the broken BP pipes coming out of the BP logo, and out of the pipe comes the oil, pluming upward.

“This work mixes computer generated 3D graphics with the iPhone’s video camera to create an augmented reality. The user is able to see the computer generated 3D objects at specific locations in the real world. The 3D graphics create the broken BP pipe which comes out of the BP logo.

“An important component of the project is that it uses BP’s corporate logo as a marker, to orient the computer-generated 3D graphics. Basically turning their own logo against them. This repurposing of corporate icons will offer future artists and activists a powerful means of expression which will be easily accessible to the masses and at the same time will be safe and nondestructive.”

“This project was created by Mark Skwarek and Joseph Hocking and is a work in progress.”

http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2010/06/augmented-reality-bp-logo-hack/

Jun 192010
 

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iPad, Android

via Byline The App Store and the Android marketplace are attractive lures for developers, but apps built to run on the mobile web can still impress. We take a look at the best frameworks available for mobile-web developers.

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/9muldowCXyI/

May 122010
 

Charlie Stross argues that Steve Jobs’ recent fascistic turn — such as his refusal to run Flash on the iPhone — is a side effect of Jobs’ planning for the coming decline in personal computer sales.

According to Stross, the market will be all about mobility. Apple will turn from selling hardware that runs its software to selling hardware that runs its cloud.

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Feb 212010
 

excerpt from Roughly Drafted: “I’m a full-time Flash developer and I’d love to get paid to make Flash sites for the iPad. I want that to make sense — but it doesn’t. Flash on the iPad will not (and should not) happen — and the main reason, as I see it, is one that never gets talked about: current Flash sites could never be made to work well on any touchscreen device, and this cannot be solved by Apple, Adobe, or magical new hardware. That’s not because of slow mobile performance, battery drain or crashes. It’s because of the hover or mouseover problem. … All that Apple and Adobe could ever do is make current Flash content visible. It would be seen, but very often would not work.”

http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/CkNWaccwT8E/Why-Flash-Is-Fundamentally-Flawed-On-Touchscreen-Devices