AndroidHaving trouble reading the news on your Samsung Galaxy while juggling a coffee cup? If you must use your tablet with only one hand, this demo shows users using only their eyes to interact with their tablets.

Plus Microsoft is looking for a few good ideas for Surface apps.

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Keep losing your iPhone? You can now dock it in your bra, toaster, kettle, prosthetic arm, or yes, under your skin.

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Mi c With i Phone and i pad illIt’s never been easier to get music onto a phone, whether it’s yours or someone else’s. These tools help you find and record music–and even bust out an app for your band using HTML5.

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Hooper Jennifer bat app aFrom assignment to App Store in five months: After creating a demo version in her New Media class, UMaine Intermedia student Jennifer Hooper teams up with NMD alum Justin Russell to release a Community Connector mobile app for local riders.

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Photo by Adobe ShadowWho’s got the right strategy for uniting content across desktop and mobile devices? (And who’s utterly failing?)

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This month’s debut of Apple’s digital textbook venture met with mixed reactions. Who’s right?

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Snap a photo of that Andy Warhol print, and your phone tells you what similar artworks lie in your price range. Tech startup Art.sy is hoping their recommendation system will make the art market more accessible to normal mortals–or at least make them a bunch of money in commissioned sales.

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Basically Skeleton is a really elegant boilerplate setup done through JS + CSS to scale a website from a desktop size to mobile resolutions. I’m currently using it on my own projects, it’s a great framework to get going if you want mobile usability.

Source: http://getskeleton.com/

:excerptstart Microsoft has unveiled Windows 8, redesigned to function on a variety of mobile and desktop platforms and compete with Android and iOS. There are a couple of things conspicuously absent.

“Earlier this morning, at the Build Windows conference in Anaheim, California, Microsoft made it patently clear that ‘To the cloud!’ is not merely a throwaway phrase: it is the entire future of the company. Every single one of Microsoft’s services, platforms, and form factors will now begin its hasty, leave-no-prisoners-behind transition to the always-on, internet-connected cloud.” netbuzz pointed out that even the famous Blue Screen of Death will get a new look. “Lastly mikejuk writes: While everyone else is looking at the surface detail of Windows 8 there are some deep changes going on. Perhaps the biggest is that Metro now provides an alternative environment that doesn’t use the age old Win32 API. This means no more overlapping windows — yes Metro really does take the windows out of Windows.”

http://tech.slashdot.org/story/11/09/14/2219226/Windows-8-Roundup

Meanwhile, prospects for Flash are looking increasingly less flashy.

“The Microsoft Windows Engineering Team has announced that the Metro interface web browser in Windows 8 will not support plug-ins — Adobe Flash included. Users will still be able to open a traditional browser interface to make use of legacy sites that rely upon plug-ins. This news follows a recent blog post by the Internet Explorer 10 team pushing the use of HTML5 video as a replacement to Flash video. With Google, Apple, Mozilla, Opera and other major players already backing HTML5 — is Adobe Flash finally dead?”

http://news.slashdot.org/story/11/09/15/1257249/Windows-8-Wont-Support-Plug-Ins-the-End-of-Flash

Is it cheating to appropriate Google Street View images as photojournalism?

The Google Street View car is like the ultimate street photographer, a robo Cartier-Bresson methodically scouring the streets and documenting what it sees. But most people use GSV for practical purposes, and they view any drama or comedy captured by the roving 360-degree camera as accidents.

A few photographers are now looking for these ‘accidents’ intentionally. Instead of walking out on the street to find interesting scenes and people, they are simply curating the pre-documented streets from the comfort of their desk at home.

Michael Wolf, for example, uses a camera to photograph scenes from Google Street View open on his computer’s browser. In February, his honorable mention in the Contemporary Issues category at the World Press Photo Awards for A Series of Unfortunate Events ignited a storm of debate. Some balked at the idea that Wolf’s project was photojournalism, while others embraced the decision and called for more conceptual leaps and redefinitions of photojournalism in the digital age.

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/LomrdS9rJDQ/

Meanwhile two women in Cincinnati are testing privacy ethics by selling reproductions of 1955 police mug shots.

http://feeds.nytimes.com/click.phdo?i=78417df2d428dc4bffb906cc42a4bc53

On another mobile front: For those who prefer their art fresh rather than refried, tablet drawing is getting more sophisticated, as on this recent release by the same company that created AutoCAD:

SketchBook Pro, essentially a digital canvas and brush set, allows you to use both your fingers and aftermarket styluses to create illustrations and designs. Included are over 60 different brush tools, the ability to create up to six different layers for one file, as well as the ability to export files to Photoshop.

The app was previously available on iPhone, iPad and Android phone devices, as well as in an expanded desktop version. This is the first version of the app that will run on Android’s tablet-optimized software, a.k.a. Honeycomb.

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/mhaWdgu5zMY/

Of course, just because you drew it on an iPad doesn’t mean you won’t be a kitschy derivative of other works–as demonstrated by a recent exhibition that showed off the iPad’s artsy side:

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/aX5h2ZGYt9E/

What would Leonardo do?

A decade ago, Sun founder Bill Joy prophesied a future without fixed prices, where bots would negotiate our most quotidian economic transactions. His future is about to become our present.

TaskRabbit is like eBay for real-world labor….It was a wintry night in February 2008, when [ Leah ] Busque, a 28-year-old engineer at IBM in Cambridge, Massachusetts, realized that she needed dog food for her yellow lab, Kobe. She wanted nothing more than to get someone else to trudge outside in the snow. “I thought, wouldn’t it be nice if there were a place online you could go,” she says. “A site where you could name the price you were willing to pay for any task. There had to be someone in my neighborhood who was willing to get that dog food for what I was willing to pay.”

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/aPyr0W88wck/

Got parking?

A new iPhone app has created a marketplace for public parking, connecting those vacating a space with those searching for one — for a fee.

Parking Auction launched earlier this week on Manhattan’s Upper West Side. The matchmaking service is beta-testing, and the folks behind it hope to expand worldwide, creating communities of relaxed, smartphone-armed parkers.

“If I’m parked on the street and wouldn’t mind moving my car to a spot half a mile away that isn’t residential, I may be happy to give it up to my neighbor that just got home from East Hampton on a Sunday night with two kids in a car she has to unload,” said founder Brian Rosetti. “We think that’s quite a neighborly and valuable service.”

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/4cuhGQtKJKA/

Camera Article LargeWith the Lytro camera, it’s shoot first, focus later, thanks to a special sensor and software that lets users change the focus on the file itself. These interactive demos suggests how this can add a new dimension of interactivity to otherwise ordinary photographs.

Meanwhile, for moving image mavens, Apple’s Final Cut is reborn at a third the price. Not everyone is pleased with its reincarnation, but most are sure to like the biggest difference: no more waiting for rendering. Yes, you heard that right.

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So we know from NMDnet that cell phones are privacy disasters–but what are they good at? How about detecting cancer, getting drivers out of speeding tickets, and blowing up terrorists, for starters?

http://mobile.slashdot.org/story/11/03/11/1847248/Smartphone-Device-Detects-Cancer-In-an-Hour?from=rss via Byline

“Scientists at the Center for Systems Biology at Massachusetts General Hospital have integrated a microNMR device that accurately detects cancer cells and integrates with a smartphone (abstract). Though just a prototype, this device enables a clinician to extract small amounts of cells from a mass inside of a patient, analyze the sample on the spot, acquire the results in an hour, and pass the results to other clinicians and into medical records rapidly. How much does the device cost to make? $200. Seriously, smartphones just got their own Samuel L. Jackson-esque wallet.” Reader Stoobalou points out other cancer-related news that Norwegian researchers have found a group of genes that increase a person’s risk to develop lung cancer.

Of course, cell phones have also been accused of causing cancer. Well, how about getting out of a speeding ticket?

http://yro.slashdot.org/story/11/02/26/021218/Smart-Phone-Gets-Driver-Out-of-a-Speeding-Ticket?from=rss

“Sahas Katta writes in Skattertech that a traffic cop pulled him over while driving home and gave him a speeding ticket but thanks to his Android, he ended up walking out of traffic court without having to pay a fine or adding a single point to his record. “I fortunately happened to have Google Tracks running when an officer cited me for speeding while heading back home from a friend’s place,” writes Katta. “The speed limit in the area was a mere 25 miles per hour and the cop’s radar gun shockingly clocked me driving over 40 miles per hour.” Once in court Katta asked the officer the last time he attended radar gun training, when the device was last calibrated, or the unit’s model number — none of which the officer could answer. “I then presented my time stamped GPS data with details about my average moving speed and maximum speed during my short drive home. Both numbers were well within the posted speed limits,” says Katta. “The judge took a moment and declared that I was not guilty, but he had an unusual statement that followed. To avoid any misinterpretations about his ruling, he chose to clarify his decision by citing the lack of evidence on the officer’s part. He mentioned that he was not familiar enough with GPS technology to make a decision based on my evidence, but I can’t help but imagine that it was an important factor.”"

Not impressed? How about the ability to blow up suicide bombers before they get to you ?

http://idle.slashdot.org/story/11/01/28/1228241/Spam-Text-Prematurely-Blows-Up-Suicide-Bomber?from=rss via Byline

“A suicide bomber’s plan to detonate explosives in Central Moscow on New Year’s Eve was foiled when she received an unexpected spam text message that caused her deadly payload to blow up too early. A message wishing her a happy new year came hours before the unnamed woman was to set off her suicide belt near Red Square, an act of terrorism that could have killed hundreds of people. Islamist terrorists in Russia often use mobile phones as detonators. The bomber’s handler, who is usually watching his charge, sends the bomber a text message to set off the explosive belt at the moment when it is thought they can inflict maximum casualties.”

How to keep these apps from wasting your phone battery? Throw one of these in your backpack.

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/6k03KlR8C0w/ via Byline

Put this tubular object in your backpack, and you can generate juice for your cellphone — just by walking around.

Deutsche Telekom tracking graphicIf Big Brother comes for you, you’ve got seven minutes to make yourself scarce after tossing your cell phone in a nearby dumpster. That’s what a German politician learned when he took his telephone carrier to court to find out how often they tracked his position–and learned Deutsche Telekom tracked him 35,000 times in 6 months, even though he never explicitly chose to share his location.

The results make for a compelling interactive graphic, but also seem to vindicate free software guru Richard Stallman’s choice never to carry a cell phone.

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So many mobile apps are just dumbed-down versions of better applications. Here’s a really useful app that puts the smart back in smartphone.

http://feeds.nytimes.com/click.phdo?i=bb16496f6dc04018e00abd0a435a1873 via Byline

A new iPhone application is designed to help blind people identify United States currency in real time by speaking the denomination aloud.

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Conspiracy theorists think this app could be used to detect drivers who pick up the phone to text, which is illegal on some states. But given the size of Maine’s potholes, it could also help locate cars that have disappeared into them.

http://apple.slashdot.org/story/11/02/10/0235239/Gov-App-Detects-Potholes-As-Your-Drive-Over-Them?from=rss via Byline An anonymous reader writes “The City of Boston has released an app that uses the accelerometer in your smartphone to automatically report bumps in the road as you drive over them. From the article: ‘The application relies on two components embedded in iPhones, Android phones, and many other mobile devices: the accelerometer and the Global Positioning System receiver. The accelerometer, which determines the direction and acceleration of a phone’s movement, can be harnessed to identify when a phone resting on a dashboard or in a cupholder in a moving car has hit a bump; the GPS receiver can determine by satellite just where that bump is located.’ I am certain that this will not be used to track your movements, unless they are vertical.”

mongoliadFamed science fiction author Neal Stephenson has unveiled a digital novel platform created with a cabal of interactive fiction / martial arts enthusiasts. To judge from initial glimpses of their first interactive novel, The Mongoliad, this “new” platform is more of a combination of older ideas: part interactive CD-ROM (Voyager in the 1980s), part paid subscription (the New York Times in the 1990s), and part user-generated content (Wikipedia in the 2000s). At least the authors have given up on DRM from the get-go.

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Two bits of good news for anyone who wants to start a simple location-based game: 1) SCVNGR offers a readymade tool for creating one; and 2) you’ll have little competition, as all the games made so far sound moronic.

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/_ved4fNYzJo/ via Byline SCVNGR is a location-based gaming platform for mobile phones that has been used in alternate-reality games for campaigns ranging from the New England Patriots to Dexter. They scored $4 million in venture capital late last year. In this article, Jane Doh takes an in-depth look at this helpful tool for puzzle designers looking for a more local flavor….

SCVNGR tasks might be a riddle, a dare, a question, or more, and they are customized precisely for the location. For example, I checked in to my nearby police precinct (No, I was not in handcuffs), and, in addition to the usual “Say something here” functionality common to the other geo-location smartphone games, SCVNGR offered me a few tasks related to law enforcement. It asked me what my favorite constitutional amendment was (Duh, the Fifth!), and in “The Swords & Scales” challenge I was asked to pose as Lady Justice and upload the picture. (Hm, yes well, the zip ties were a problem.)

Alberti would have had an aneurysm if he had seen this Augmented Perspective.

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