AndroidHaving trouble reading the news on your Samsung Galaxy while juggling a coffee cup? If you must use your tablet with only one hand, this demo shows users using only their eyes to interact with their tablets.

Plus Microsoft is looking for a few good ideas for Surface apps.

Continue reading »

3d Printed gunA rundown of stuff you can now make with 3d printers includes eagle’s beaks (there’s an eagle wearing one now), Escher buildings, the world’s fastest shoe, iPhone cases, and yes, pistols.

Continue reading »

Lay down some trippy tunes with a $1 Moog while the offer lasts. Plus, Sim City meets music looper in the addictive Isle of Tune.

This vintage-looking virtual instrument resembles Zoran Djuranovic’s New Media capstone from last year.

The Animoog takes the familiar, spaced-out sound profile Moog is famous for and warps it, using the iPad’s multi-touch interface and some very cool animated visualizations to create a unique instrument. It’s simple enough for anyone to play, but also deep enough to encourage extended experimentation. On top of that accomplishment, the Animoog is just about the trippiest sound-thing available for the iPad.

The app debuts in the App Store this week for an introductory price of $1. After a short while, it will go up to $30. If you’re at all interested in making music on your iPad, you should download this and start playing with it….

The musical instruments company, founded by electronics pioneer Bob Moog in the 1950s, makes keyboards that sell for thousands of dollars and are used in studios and on stages by the biggest names in rock and pop. Radiohead, Rush, Air, Stevie Wonder — they’re all Moog devotees.

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/sRCqMKQKiYE/

Back in the 1990s there was a grid-based looper called Absolut DJ. Musicians like DJ Spooky would add arrows and other symbols to the matrix, steering the music around like virtual traffic cops. That site is long gone, but this sounds like a worthy successor.

We haven’t seen anything remotely like Isle of Tune for iPad, which was released Friday, with the exception of the web-based Isle of Tune, which impressed us late last year with its utterly unique approach to songsmithery.

Both apps let you draw roads, populate them with houses and trees to indicate beats and notes, and then activate the whole thing with cars that drive down the streets in predictable patterns, “playing” each thing they drive past.

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/0aCzKJ7PAcg/

And speaking of New Media capstones, this throwable camera is reminiscent of Jesse Melanson’s Club Ball capstone.

Jonas Pfeil, a student from the Technical University of Berlin, has created a rugged, grapefruit-sized ball that has 36 fixed-focus, 2-megapixel digital camera sensors built in. The user simply throws the ball into the air and photos are simultaneously taken with all 36 cameras to create a full, spherical panorama of the surrounding scene. The ball itself is made with a 3D printer, and the innards (which includes 36 STM VS6724 CMOS camera sensors, an accelerometer, and two microcontrollers to control the cameras) are adequately padded, so presumably it doesn’t matter if you’re bad at throwing and catching.

http://hardware.slashdot.org/story/11/10/14/1840224/throwable-36-camera-ball-takes-spherical-panoramas

if you are interested in any of these jobs, contact these folks directly or via New Media Department chair Larry Latour or Jon Ippolito.

Continue reading »

This would be a lot cooler if Dustin O’Conner hadn’t already done it in my Creative Networks class.

Is there anywhere JavaScript can’t go?

http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2011/01/kinect-javascript-handwaving-browser/ (Via Bruce Sterling)

*Another lash-up. They’re coming thick and fast. I’ve never seen a tech-development scene work like this before — so virally. This is not “Augmented Reality,” it’s more of a gestural interface… but c’mon, it’s 2011 and they’re websurfing by waving their hands.

DepthJS from Fluid Interfaces on Vimeo.

If I were thinking about a new media installation I’d try to get my hands on one of these.

http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2010/11/another-kinect-hack-thats-vastly-more-interesting-than-the-games/

*I may have to start a whole category for these, because they’re coming thick and fast and it’s only been a week. Looks like Microsoft accidentally invented a primo piece of art-installation hardware.

“Skinput is a system from Carnegie Mellon’s Chris Harrison that monitors acoustic signals on your arm to translate gestures and taps into input commands. Just by touching different points on your arm, hand, or fingers you can tell your portable device to change volume, answer a call, or turn itself off. Even better, Harrison can couple Skinput with a pico projector so that you can see a graphic interface on your arm and use the acoustic signals to control it. The project is set to be presented at this year’s SIGCHI conference in April, but you can check it out now in several video demonstrations

http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/JWO3sJUIK2A/Skinput-Turns-Your-Body-Into-Your-IO

Compare the extraordinary electric body installations of Italian artist Sonia Cillari, who proves that you don’t have to move to perform.

Bookmark this category

“Skinput is a system from Carnegie Mellon’s Chris Harrison that monitors acoustic signals on your arm to translate gestures and taps into input commands. Just by touching different points on your arm, hand, or fingers you can tell your portable device to change volume, answer a call, or turn itself off. Even better, Harrison can couple Skinput with a pico projector so that you can see a graphic interface on your arm and use the acoustic signals to control it. The project is set to be presented at this year’s SIGCHI conference in April, but you can check it out now in several video demonstrations

http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/JWO3sJUIK2A/Skinput-Turns-Your-Body-Into-Your-IO

Compare the extraordinary electric body installations of Italian artist Sonia Cillari, who proves that you don’t have to move to perform.

ommwriter_interfaceAbout as far from Microsoft Word as you can get:

Ommwriter screencast.

Video artist Gary Hill once responded to the question of how his work should be displayed when CRTs became obsolete with the suggestion that his video should be projected on his viewers’ bodies from inside their skin.

When Hill was participating in the TechArcheology workshops a decade ago, this suggestion sounded flippant (and was perhaps meant to be). But now mainstream science has caught up with this nutty vision, and it looks like the porn industry won’t be far behind.

So what happens when your LED tattoo goes obsolete? Microsoft customers had better be diligent about downloading the latest “patches,” or they’ll end up sporting the Blue Skin of Death.

© 2011 UMaine NMDNet Suffusion theme by Sayontan Sinha