Lay down some trippy tunes with a $1 Moog while the offer lasts. Plus, Sim City meets music looper in the addictive Isle of Tune.

This vintage-looking virtual instrument resembles Zoran Djuranovic’s New Media capstone from last year.

The Animoog takes the familiar, spaced-out sound profile Moog is famous for and warps it, using the iPad’s multi-touch interface and some very cool animated visualizations to create a unique instrument. It’s simple enough for anyone to play, but also deep enough to encourage extended experimentation. On top of that accomplishment, the Animoog is just about the trippiest sound-thing available for the iPad.

The app debuts in the App Store this week for an introductory price of $1. After a short while, it will go up to $30. If you’re at all interested in making music on your iPad, you should download this and start playing with it….

The musical instruments company, founded by electronics pioneer Bob Moog in the 1950s, makes keyboards that sell for thousands of dollars and are used in studios and on stages by the biggest names in rock and pop. Radiohead, Rush, Air, Stevie Wonder — they’re all Moog devotees.

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/sRCqMKQKiYE/

Back in the 1990s there was a grid-based looper called Absolut DJ. Musicians like DJ Spooky would add arrows and other symbols to the matrix, steering the music around like virtual traffic cops. That site is long gone, but this sounds like a worthy successor.

We haven’t seen anything remotely like Isle of Tune for iPad, which was released Friday, with the exception of the web-based Isle of Tune, which impressed us late last year with its utterly unique approach to songsmithery.

Both apps let you draw roads, populate them with houses and trees to indicate beats and notes, and then activate the whole thing with cars that drive down the streets in predictable patterns, “playing” each thing they drive past.

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/0aCzKJ7PAcg/

And speaking of New Media capstones, this throwable camera is reminiscent of Jesse Melanson’s Club Ball capstone.

Jonas Pfeil, a student from the Technical University of Berlin, has created a rugged, grapefruit-sized ball that has 36 fixed-focus, 2-megapixel digital camera sensors built in. The user simply throws the ball into the air and photos are simultaneously taken with all 36 cameras to create a full, spherical panorama of the surrounding scene. The ball itself is made with a 3D printer, and the innards (which includes 36 STM VS6724 CMOS camera sensors, an accelerometer, and two microcontrollers to control the cameras) are adequately padded, so presumably it doesn’t matter if you’re bad at throwing and catching.

http://hardware.slashdot.org/story/11/10/14/1840224/throwable-36-camera-ball-takes-spherical-panoramas

Francis Ford Coppola may be best known for directing blockbusters like The Godfather and Apocalypse Now, but he’s giving over control of his latest flick to a digital DJ.

While Coppola’s remixable film may sound outlandish to some, in new media circles it’s almost old hat. Mike Figgis remixed his 2000 film Timecode–already unusual for its four screens of the same footage shot in one take with no editing–live at the 2006 Zero One festival curated by Steve Dietz. And a self-remixing film has been the subject of a number of U-Me capstones.

Timecode (2000) Four cameras. One take. No edits. Real time. http://m.imdb.com/title/tt0220100

Compare Twixt:

Coppola turned members of the Hall H crowd into test subjects for his wild idea to turn movies into live entertainment. Accompanied onstage by musician Dan Deacon and actor Val Kilmer, Coppola used a touchpad to select scenes from Twixt on the fly as Deacon tweaked the soundtrack.

Coppola said Twixt was conceived as a way to inject a live feel into cinema.

“What I’d love to do is go on tour,” he said, “like a month before the film opened, and go to all the cities myself, with my collaborators, with live music and actually perform the film for each audience uniquely for them — a different version for each audience. That’s what opera was like.”

Twixt centers on a horror writer who stumbles onto strange goings-on, and maybe vampires, in a small town. During one segment screened Saturday, the writer, played by Val Kilmer, brainstorms alone in his hotel room. Coppola and his tech crew spliced together different mixes of the montage, during which Kilmer assumed various personas.

“Theoretically, I could push the Shuffle button,” Coppola said.

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/uSwOEiYQREI/

Continue reading »

If I were thinking about a new media installation I’d try to get my hands on one of these.

http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2010/11/another-kinect-hack-thats-vastly-more-interesting-than-the-games/

*I may have to start a whole category for these, because they’re coming thick and fast and it’s only been a week. Looks like Microsoft accidentally invented a primo piece of art-installation hardware.

No, we’re not talking piercings. The latest in interactive installations are on view at the 2010 Ars Electronica, the same festival where NMD students Kristen Murphy, Max Langton, Matt James, and John Bell presented in 2002.

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/MarPwmaPkY4/ via Byline Robots, phantom limbs and a nostril-powered digital painting take center stage at Ars Electronica 2010. Organizers for the digital arts festival, a longtime magnet for madcap interactive designers, describe this year’s exhibition as “a response to impending doom….”

Italian artist Sonia Cillari exhales through a cable connecting her left nostril to the center of a big screen. Her breathing defines the contours of a digital creature called “feather.”

mongoliadFamed science fiction author Neal Stephenson has unveiled a digital novel platform created with a cabal of interactive fiction / martial arts enthusiasts. To judge from initial glimpses of their first interactive novel, The Mongoliad, this “new” platform is more of a combination of older ideas: part interactive CD-ROM (Voyager in the 1980s), part paid subscription (the New York Times in the 1990s), and part user-generated content (Wikipedia in the 2000s). At least the authors have given up on DRM from the get-go.

Continue reading »

“Skinput is a system from Carnegie Mellon’s Chris Harrison that monitors acoustic signals on your arm to translate gestures and taps into input commands. Just by touching different points on your arm, hand, or fingers you can tell your portable device to change volume, answer a call, or turn itself off. Even better, Harrison can couple Skinput with a pico projector so that you can see a graphic interface on your arm and use the acoustic signals to control it. The project is set to be presented at this year’s SIGCHI conference in April, but you can check it out now in several video demonstrations

http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/JWO3sJUIK2A/Skinput-Turns-Your-Body-Into-Your-IO

Compare the extraordinary electric body installations of Italian artist Sonia Cillari, who proves that you don’t have to move to perform.

Bookmark this category

“Skinput is a system from Carnegie Mellon’s Chris Harrison that monitors acoustic signals on your arm to translate gestures and taps into input commands. Just by touching different points on your arm, hand, or fingers you can tell your portable device to change volume, answer a call, or turn itself off. Even better, Harrison can couple Skinput with a pico projector so that you can see a graphic interface on your arm and use the acoustic signals to control it. The project is set to be presented at this year’s SIGCHI conference in April, but you can check it out now in several video demonstrations

http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/JWO3sJUIK2A/Skinput-Turns-Your-Body-Into-Your-IO

Compare the extraordinary electric body installations of Italian artist Sonia Cillari, who proves that you don’t have to move to perform.

excerpt from Roughly Drafted: “I’m a full-time Flash developer and I’d love to get paid to make Flash sites for the iPad. I want that to make sense — but it doesn’t. Flash on the iPad will not (and should not) happen — and the main reason, as I see it, is one that never gets talked about: current Flash sites could never be made to work well on any touchscreen device, and this cannot be solved by Apple, Adobe, or magical new hardware. That’s not because of slow mobile performance, battery drain or crashes. It’s because of the hover or mouseover problem. … All that Apple and Adobe could ever do is make current Flash content visible. It would be seen, but very often would not work.”

http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/CkNWaccwT8E/Why-Flash-Is-Fundamentally-Flawed-On-Touchscreen-Devices

Bookmark this category

excerpt from Roughly Drafted: “I’m a full-time Flash developer and I’d love to get paid to make Flash sites for the iPad. I want that to make sense — but it doesn’t. Flash on the iPad will not (and should not) happen — and the main reason, as I see it, is one that never gets talked about: current Flash sites could never be made to work well on any touchscreen device, and this cannot be solved by Apple, Adobe, or magical new hardware. That’s not because of slow mobile performance, battery drain or crashes. It’s because of the hover or mouseover problem. … All that Apple and Adobe could ever do is make current Flash content visible. It would be seen, but very often would not work.”

http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/CkNWaccwT8E/Why-Flash-Is-Fundamentally-Flawed-On-Touchscreen-Devices

:excerptstart:Edinburgh interaction design competition–deadline in March.excerptend

Create10 :: the conference for innovative interaction design

30th June – 2nd July 2010

Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh UK

http://www.create-conference.org/

+ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +

The Create10 conference is seeking submissions in the form of full papers, workshops, short presentations, demonstrations and exhibits.

THEME : : Transitions

Analogue <> Digital

Academic <>Practice

Place <> Time

Real <> Virtual

We invite case studies of innovative design from the commercial, academic, public, government and research sectors. Cases can come from any paradigm – the web, mobile and hand held, products or consumer electronics. We would particularly like to encourage submissions from students. They will be given the opportunity to showcase and discuss both finished work and work-in-progress in a supportive environment.

The Create conference centres on the discipline of interaction design, a young disciple with roots in human-computer interaction, ergonomics, product and graphic design, multi-media and art. An interaction designer is a difficult person to pigeon hole and can be found in mobile phone companies, consumer product manufacturers, design consultancies, as a single practitioner, or within academic computing and design departments.

We are seeking original, unpublished work under the following categories:

Full Papers (2 stage submission)

: : High quality academic papers for peer review (max 6 pages)

Other Submissions (single stage)

: : Practical half-day workshops

: : Short papers and/or case studies from practitioners within the field

: : Short presentations and/or posters from students to be presented in informal student sessions

: : Demonstrations and/or videos of installation-based exhibits or creative work in progress

Please note that all successful authors will be expected to pay to register for the event.

+ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +

IMPORTANT DATES

Submissions of :

max 1 page abstracts for papers : 15th March 2010

max 2 page proposals for all other submissions : 31st March 2010

Notification of acceptance : Early April 2010

Full paper submission : End of April 2010

http://www.create-conference.org/calls-for-participation/

+ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +

Student Design Competition

In addition to the above call Create10 is organising a unique competition for students.

Today=92s art, design and technology students are the people who will be defining what the interdisciplinary field of interaction design will become in the near future. Create10 is a conference that celebrates innovative interaction design, whether digital products, services, environments or new interaction paradigms.

This competition is aimed at students from a wide range of disciplines, for example: interaction design, product design, industrial design, communications design, architecture, fashion, multimedia, HCI, and related fields. Students, both undergraduate and postgraduate, can enter for up to a year after completing their studies.

Entries will be assessed by a jury of leading creative design practitioners and academics: Dr Shaleph O=92Neill, Mark Daniels, Anab Jain, Crispin Jones, Di Mainstone, Christopher Pearson

All selected submissions will be exhibited at the Create10 conference exhibition in June/July 2010 in Edinburgh, at New Media Scotland’s Inspace. There will be one free conference place available for each successful entry, as well as access to assistance with travel.

Further details here: http://www.create-conference.org/student-competition/=

+ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +

http://www.create-conference.org/

On 25 February 2009, the University launched its new name, Edinburgh Napier=

University. For more information please visit our website.

Edinburgh Napier University is one of the top 10 universities in the UK for=

graduate employability (HESA 2009)

Create10 :: the conference for innovative interaction design

30th June – 2nd July 2010

Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh UK

http://www.create-conference.org/

+ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +

The Create10 conference is seeking submissions in the form of full papers, workshops, short presentations, demonstrations and exhibits.

THEME : : Transitions

Analogue Digital

Academic Practice

Place Time

Real Virtual

We invite case studies of innovative design from the commercial, academic, public, government and research sectors. Cases can come from any paradigm – the web, mobile and hand held, products or consumer electronics. We would particularly like to encourage submissions from students. They will be given the opportunity to showcase and discuss both finished work and work-in-progress in a supportive environment.

The Create conference centres on the discipline of interaction design, a young disciple with roots in human-computer interaction, ergonomics, product and graphic design, multi-media and art. An interaction designer is a difficult person to pigeon hole and can be found in mobile phone companies, consumer product manufacturers, design consultancies, as a single practitioner, or within academic computing and design departments.

We are seeking original, unpublished work under the following categories:

Full Papers (2 stage submission)

: : High quality academic papers for peer review (max 6 pages)

Other Submissions (single stage)

: : Practical half-day workshops

: : Short papers and/or case studies from practitioners within the field

: : Short presentations and/or posters from students to be presented in informal student sessions

: : Demonstrations and/or videos of installation-based exhibits or creative work in progress

Please note that all successful authors will be expected to pay to register for the event.

+ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +

IMPORTANT DATES

Submissions of :

max 1 page abstracts for papers : 15th March 2010

max 2 page proposals for all other submissions : 31st March 2010

Notification of acceptance : Early April 2010

Full paper submission : End of April 2010

http://www.create-conference.org/calls-for-participation/

+ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +

Student Design Competition

In addition to the above call Create10 is organising a unique competition for students.

Today=92s art, design and technology students are the people who will be defining what the interdisciplinary field of interaction design will become in the near future. Create10 is a conference that celebrates innovative interaction design, whether digital products, services, environments or new interaction paradigms.

This competition is aimed at students from a wide range of disciplines, for example: interaction design, product design, industrial design, communications design, architecture, fashion, multimedia, HCI, and related fields. Students, both undergraduate and postgraduate, can enter for up to a year after completing their studies.

Entries will be assessed by a jury of leading creative design practitioners and academics: Dr Shaleph O=92Neill, Mark Daniels, Anab Jain, Crispin Jones, Di Mainstone, Christopher Pearson

All selected submissions will be exhibited at the Create10 conference exhibition in June/July 2010 in Edinburgh, at New Media Scotland’s Inspace. There will be one free conference place available for each successful entry, as well as access to assistance with travel.

Further details here: http://www.create-conference.org/student-competition/=

+ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +

http://www.create-conference.org/

On 25 February 2009, the University launched its new name, Edinburgh Napier=

University. For more information please visit our website.

Edinburgh Napier University is one of the top 10 universities in the UK for=

graduate employability (HESA 2009)

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