Adobe LogoYou won’t get your next copy of Photoshop on a CD or via download. Adobe has announced that its popular suite of editing apps, including such graphic design workhorses as Illustrator and Dreamweaver, will be sold by subscription only.

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The average new media student might hesitate to rent just one application at Adobe’s asking price. But Adobe’s throwing in all its apps, plus the ability to swap work on your project from mobile to desktop application with all changes stored in the cloud.

Adobe is making a big splash into the cloud with its Creative Cloud service, launching an enhanced online version of its sought-after Adobe Creative Suite for $50 a month on a one-year contract….

Adobe Touch Apps. Capture and iterate on your idea on your iPad or Android tablet and then sync your work to your Creative Suite desktop application, where you can refine your design.

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/y_yOSoQSiac/

Thanks to new, easy-to-use standards, the Web just got a lot more animated.

There are some really compelling demonstrations out there that showcase the use of video in conjunction with WebGL and other modern web standards. For example, the spinnjng cube at webkit.org and video shader demo from the 3 Dreams of Black interactive film give you a taste of what’s possible when Web pages go 3d.

http://www.webkit.org/blog-files/3d-transforms/morphing-cubes.html

http://www.ro.me/tech/

Three-dimensional effects don’t yet work in every browser, however. Some have been hard-coded to work only in Chrome or Safari, though Firefox should support them soon.

Confused? Help is on the way.

A new website helps web developers decipher the often confusing world of HTML5 and CSS 3. Which elements are ready to use? Which are still not widely supported? And where can you find polyfills and fallbacks for older browsers? HTML5 Please has your answers.

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/ufTC42Hm6o8/

For many developers, the best thjng about HTML5 is that it will drastically simplify the now byzantine process of adding video and audio to a Web page. Here’s a report just on exactly where it’s safe to use this new technique:

For a very thorough rundown of exactly where and how well HTML5 video works on the web right now, check out the excellent report on the state of HTML5 video from Long Tail Video. Put together by the makers of JW Player, an HTML5 video player toolkit, the state of HTML5 video report is mercifully free of any evangelism for any particular technology. Instead it offers a level-headed look at reality, answering the basic questions — where can you use HTML5 video? How well will it work for users? And when will you need Flash fallbacks?

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/iZZg_GSuQEo/

Firefox 10 now has a suite of sophisticated developer tools baked in–though my early tests suggest that its popular add-on Firebug remains the best debugger in the business.

Mozilla has released Firefox 10, which features new and improved tools for web developers as well as more support for emerging web standards.

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/6XwMzKq0eJ0/

One problem that Mozilla hasn’t solved is less technical than philosophical: whether to add DRM to an open video standard so Netflix et al. will adopt it.

“The problem is that some big content providers insist on onerous DRM that necessarily violates some of our open web principles (such as web content being equally usable on any platform, based on royalty-free standards, and those standards being implementable in free software),” O’Callahan wrote. “We will probably get into a situation where web video distributors will be desperate for an in-browser strong DRM solution ASAP, and most browser vendors (who don’t care all that much about those principles) will step up to give them whatever they want, leaving Mozilla in another difficult position. I wish I could see a reasonable solution, but right now I can’t. It seems even harder than the codec problem.”

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/J2ty5AACSVw/

:excerptstart Microsoft has unveiled Windows 8, redesigned to function on a variety of mobile and desktop platforms and compete with Android and iOS. There are a couple of things conspicuously absent.

“Earlier this morning, at the Build Windows conference in Anaheim, California, Microsoft made it patently clear that ‘To the cloud!’ is not merely a throwaway phrase: it is the entire future of the company. Every single one of Microsoft’s services, platforms, and form factors will now begin its hasty, leave-no-prisoners-behind transition to the always-on, internet-connected cloud.” netbuzz pointed out that even the famous Blue Screen of Death will get a new look. “Lastly mikejuk writes: While everyone else is looking at the surface detail of Windows 8 there are some deep changes going on. Perhaps the biggest is that Metro now provides an alternative environment that doesn’t use the age old Win32 API. This means no more overlapping windows — yes Metro really does take the windows out of Windows.”

http://tech.slashdot.org/story/11/09/14/2219226/Windows-8-Roundup

Meanwhile, prospects for Flash are looking increasingly less flashy.

“The Microsoft Windows Engineering Team has announced that the Metro interface web browser in Windows 8 will not support plug-ins — Adobe Flash included. Users will still be able to open a traditional browser interface to make use of legacy sites that rely upon plug-ins. This news follows a recent blog post by the Internet Explorer 10 team pushing the use of HTML5 video as a replacement to Flash video. With Google, Apple, Mozilla, Opera and other major players already backing HTML5 — is Adobe Flash finally dead?”

http://news.slashdot.org/story/11/09/15/1257249/Windows-8-Wont-Support-Plug-Ins-the-End-of-Flash

Yes, it’s only Flash video, and then only because a third-party app converts it to HTML5 first. But this could be the first chink in the great Flashwall of Apple.

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CSS cheat sheetIf cheating is the pedagogy of the Internet, this could be the textbook. In addition to the usual suspects like CSS and PHP, this compilation includes some popular frameworks like jQuery and Ruby on Rails. (via Amy Pierce)

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Flash and 3d vector overlays would seem to be a no brainer for the AR market. If Adobe had pushed this out the door sooner it might have contributed pressure on Apple to enable Flash on its handhelds.

http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2010/07/augmented-reality-earthmine-sdk-for-flash/

“The earthmine SDK for Flash provides developers with the ability to create immersive, detailed, and spatially accurate street level 3D experiences using the Adobe Flash, Flex and AIR frameworks providing for a variety of deployment options. Create and display contextually relevant information about places by attaching overlays to real-world objects and features in 3D space.”

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Sure, sound in a Web page can be horribly misused. But now when it has a legitimate purpose, you won’t have to kill a mosquito with a cannon by drumming up a Flash file just to play a beep.

Imagine if you could grab and manipulate audio with JavaScript just like you can images with Canvas. Firefox experimental builds let you do just that: crazy audio visualizations, a graphic equalizer, even text-to-speech, all in JavaScript! Work in progress; you need a special build of Firefox (videos available), being worked on via W3C.

http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/fnfEngBMfXE/Breakthroughs-In-HTML-Audio-Via-Manipulation-With-JavaScript

Sure, sound in a Web page can be horribly misused. But now when it has a legitimate purpose, you won’t have to kill a mosquito with a cannon by drumming up a Flash file just to play a beep.

Imagine if you could grab and manipulate audio with JavaScript just like you can images with Canvas. Firefox experimental builds let you do just that: crazy audio visualizations, a graphic equalizer, even text-to-speech, all in JavaScript! Work in progress; you need a special build of Firefox (videos available), being worked on via W3C.

http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/fnfEngBMfXE/Breakthroughs-In-HTML-Audio-Via-Manipulation-With-JavaScript

Charlie Stross argues that Steve Jobs’ recent fascistic turn — such as his refusal to run Flash on the iPhone — is a side effect of Jobs’ planning for the coming decline in personal computer sales.

According to Stross, the market will be all about mobility. Apple will turn from selling hardware that runs its software to selling hardware that runs its cloud.

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excerpt from Roughly Drafted: “I’m a full-time Flash developer and I’d love to get paid to make Flash sites for the iPad. I want that to make sense — but it doesn’t. Flash on the iPad will not (and should not) happen — and the main reason, as I see it, is one that never gets talked about: current Flash sites could never be made to work well on any touchscreen device, and this cannot be solved by Apple, Adobe, or magical new hardware. That’s not because of slow mobile performance, battery drain or crashes. It’s because of the hover or mouseover problem. … All that Apple and Adobe could ever do is make current Flash content visible. It would be seen, but very often would not work.”

http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/CkNWaccwT8E/Why-Flash-Is-Fundamentally-Flawed-On-Touchscreen-Devices

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excerpt from Roughly Drafted: “I’m a full-time Flash developer and I’d love to get paid to make Flash sites for the iPad. I want that to make sense — but it doesn’t. Flash on the iPad will not (and should not) happen — and the main reason, as I see it, is one that never gets talked about: current Flash sites could never be made to work well on any touchscreen device, and this cannot be solved by Apple, Adobe, or magical new hardware. That’s not because of slow mobile performance, battery drain or crashes. It’s because of the hover or mouseover problem. … All that Apple and Adobe could ever do is make current Flash content visible. It would be seen, but very often would not work.”

http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/CkNWaccwT8E/Why-Flash-Is-Fundamentally-Flawed-On-Touchscreen-Devices

Which do you feel has more capabilities/setbacks for interactive multimedia on the web? http://www.webreference.com/programming/javascript/java_flash/

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Which do you feel has more capabilities/setbacks for interactive multimedia on the web? http://www.webreference.com/programming/javascript/java_flash/

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From Slashdot:

“Someone has gone and done it. Tobias Schneider has created a Flash player written in JavaScript targeting SVG/HTML5-capable browsers. It’s not a complete implementation yet, but it shows real promise. A few demos have been posted online. How long before HTML5/SVG next- generation browsers like Chrome, Firefox, Opera, Safari, Epiphany, and other Web-Kit based browsers completely supplant Flash and Silverlight/ Moonlight?”

The only question is, should we be investing in writing open-source Flash players that use HTML5, or just making open-source animations in HTML5 to begin with?

Flash

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