Why buy your own car/CDs/power tools, when your neighbors already have loads of them?

Rachel Botsman makes the case:

http://www.ted.com/talks/rachel_botsman_the_case_for_collaborative_consumption.html

NeighborGoods is already up to 2.0:

http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2011/03/neighborgoods-kickstarter/ (Via Bruce Sterling).

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/mickipedia/neighbors-helping-neighborgoods

Thanks to you, NeighborGoods has quickly become the leading online community for local resource sharing. Now, we’re reaching out directly to our members to help us take NeighborGoods to the next level.

We’re gearing up to launch NeighborGoods 2.0, which focuses on creating sharing communities for organizations, companies and and groups of all sizes.

Smartphones help:

People will ditch their cars and embrace mass transit if they have the tools to manage their commutes. Enter the smartphone … http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/iPSyBkh6X_g/ Xatori unveils a free iPhone app that enables drivers to punch in their destinations and locate outlet owners who are willing to share. http://feeds.nytimes.com/click.phdo?i=fa66fe847e6ccd56e61dde5770c4ffbf

Now, to Find a Parking Spot, Drivers Look on Their Phones http://feeds.nytimes.com/click.phdo?i=d9838be80c3361a169de04e52c21ba99

And Zipcar’s IPO is meteoric:

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/vQEd37Mmv0A/ via Byline

Zipcar raises $174 million and sees its stock price soar a whopping 60 percent in its first day as a public company. The decade-old car sharing company, maybe the most disruptive entrant in the automobile rental space since Rent-A-Wreck, is now a billion-dollar operation.

Wired magazine spoke with Science writer and Hack the Planet author Eli Kintisch about the moral and scientific dilemmas of considering global interventions to solve climate change. On reading the interview, I’m terrified to learn how many companies are itching to get into the geoengineering business, by marketing sun-absorbing aerosols to disperse in clouds or patenting new types of algae that munch up carbon in the oceans.

Kintisch makes the analogy between nuclear weapons and geoengineering as two horrific projects that scientists research, all the while hoping they will never be used. If that analogy is justified, then we should no sooner entrust private enterprise with saving the planet than we should put them in charge of building and deploying atomic bombs.

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Biomimicry meets architecture. Could be a great leap forward in sustainability, but could also give a whole new meaning to the concept of a “sick” building.

http://www.buildingcentre.co.uk/events/event_diary_details.asp?id=510

Unconventional Computing & Architecture

Friday 26 February, 9.00am – 6.00pm

This one-day conference explores new materials for architectural practice in the 21st century. International architects and scientists will explore the decision-making properties of matter and how this may be applied to create increasingly life-like buildings.

Organised by The Bartlett´s Advanced Virtual and Technological Architecture Research (AVATAR) group, (((A-OK name for 2010))) the conference aims to bring together architects and scientists who are working with new technologies that are capable of self-assembly and organization.

Such technologies may form the basis for architecture generated by unconventional computing techniques which range from the actions of protocells, (entirely synthetic DNA-less agents), slime moulds (simple organisms with very complex behaviours), crystalline computing (using the organizing properties of molecules) and algae (that can be engineered to respond to environments in new ways).

“Increasingly life-like buildings.” Uhm… what if they’re predatory?–Bruce Sterling

http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2010/02/unconventional-computing-and-architecture/

Biomimicry meets architecture. Could be a great leap forward in sustainability, but could also give a whole new meaning to the concept of a “sick” building.

http://www.buildingcentre.co.uk/events/event_diary_details.asp?id=510

Unconventional Computing & Architecture

Friday 26 February, 9.00am – 6.00pm

This one-day conference explores new materials for architectural practice in the 21st century. International architects and scientists will explore the decision-making properties of matter and how this may be applied to create increasingly life-like buildings.

Organised by The Bartlett´s Advanced Virtual and Technological Architecture Research (AVATAR) group, (((A-OK name for 2010))) the conference aims to bring together architects and scientists who are working with new technologies that are capable of self-assembly and organization.

Such technologies may form the basis for architecture generated by unconventional computing techniques which range from the actions of protocells, (entirely synthetic DNA-less agents), slime moulds (simple organisms with very complex behaviours), crystalline computing (using the organizing properties of molecules) and algae (that can be engineered to respond to environments in new ways).

“Increasingly life-like buildings.” Uhm… what if they’re predatory?–Bruce Sterling

http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2010/02/unconventional-computing-and-architecture/

How do we increase the number of people walking in any given city? Easy, just add more designated parking spaces for them. The group Springtime created these “Person Parking” spaces as a part of a design competition held in Milan.

From Springtime:

“Duepercinque is a design competition part of the Public Design Festival in Milan. The mission: develop a creative solution for a parking spot of 2×5 meter (due per cinque), returning it to the public domain in a positive way.”

Great idea for those long walks around the block, but can we add some cushions in version 2.0?

[ http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2009/05/person-parking-an-urban-intervention/ ]http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2009/05/person-parking-an-urban-intervention/

How do we increase the number of people walking in any given city? Easy, just add more designated parking spaces for them. The group Springtime created these “Person Parking” spaces as a part of a design competition held in Milan.

From Springtime:

“Duepercinque is a design competition part of the Public Design Festival in Milan. The mission: develop a creative solution for a parking spot of 2×5 meter (due per cinque), returning it to the public domain in a positive way.”

Great idea for those long walks around the block, but can we add some cushions in version 2.0?

[ http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2009/05/person-parking-an-urban-intervention/ ]http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2009/05/person-parking-an-urban-intervention/

Bookmark this category
How do we increase the number of people walking in any given city? Easy, just add more designated parking spaces for them. The group Springtime created these “Person Parking” spaces as a part of a design competition held in Milan.

From Springtime:

“Duepercinque is a design competition part of the Public Design Festival in Milan. The mission: develop a creative solution for a parking spot of 2×5 meter (due per cinque), returning it to the public domain in a positive way.”

Great idea for those long walks around the block, but can we add some cushions in version 2.0?

[ http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2009/05/person-parking-an-urban-intervention/ ]http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2009/05/person-parking-an-urban-intervention/

relationships, space, architecture, intermedia

#imag1#Ward Shelley is an artist who creates architectural constraints (“Stability”, “Flatland”) that confine performers to negotiate together a shared space. It’s a great example of how you can investigate new forms of social interaction with pulleys and rebar instead of computers and Web sites.

They’re reminiscent of MTAA’s 1-Year Performance Project (hosted by U- Me)–or better yet, life in a submarine.

http://www.wardshelley.com/

relationships, space, architecture, intermedia

#imag1#Ward Shelley is an artist who creates architectural constraints (“Stability”, “Flatland”) that confine performers to negotiate together a shared space. It’s a great example of how you can investigate new forms of social interaction with pulleys and rebar instead of computers and Web sites.

They’re reminiscent of MTAA’s 1-Year Performance Project (hosted by U- Me)–or better yet, life in a submarine.

http://www.wardshelley.com/

Ward Shelley is an artist who creates architectural constraints (“Stability”, “Flatland”) that confine performers to negotiate together a shared space. It’s a great example of how you can investigate new forms of social interaction with pulleys and rebar instead of computers and Web sites.

They’re reminiscent of MTAA’s 1-Year Performance Project (hosted by U- Me)–or better yet, life in a submarine.

http://www.wardshelley.com/

http://www.treehugger.com/files/2010/01/eco-friendly-mobile-phone-runs-on-coke.php

A bio-battery running on Coke (or another such sugary drink) has the potential to run 3x as long as standard lithium batteries, while being fully biodegradable. Nice!

img1 caption=’A cell phone that runs on Coke.’

http://www.treehugger.com/files/2010/01/eco-friendly-mobile-phone-runs-on-coke.php

A bio-battery running on Coke (or another such sugary drink) has the potential to run 3x as long as standard lithium batteries, while being fully biodegradable. Nice!

img1 caption=’A cell phone that runs on Coke.’

Bookmark this category

http://www.treehugger.com/files/2010/01/eco-friendly-mobile-phone-runs-on-coke.php

A bio-battery running on Coke (or another such sugary drink) has the potential to run 3x as long as standard lithium batteries, while being fully biodegradable. Nice!

img1 caption=’A cell phone that runs on Coke.’

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