Europe’s largest IT company wants to replace email with IM, social networks, and face-to-face meetings. If only 11 percent of 11 to 19 year-olds use email, will it go the way of the dodo?

Of course, replacing email with f2f meetings would mean greater privacy, while relying on Facebook and Twitter would mean significantly less–especially now that JavaScript is making encryption easier for Web-based email:

http://developers.slashdot.org/story/11/11/22/0422223/openpgp-implemented-in-javascript

“Thierry Breton, CEO of Atos, Europe’s Largest IT Company, wants a ‘zero email’ policy to be in place in 18 months, arguing that only 10 per cent of the 200 electronic messages his employees receive per day on average turn out to be useful, and that staff spend between 5-20 hours handling emails every week. ‘The email is no longer the appropriate (communication) tool,’ says Breton. ‘The deluge of information will be one of the most important problems a company will have to face (in the future). It is time to think differently.’ Instead Breton wants staff at Atos to use chat-type collaborative services inspired by social networking sites like Facebook or Twitter as surveys show that the younger generation have already all but scrapped email, with only 11 per cent of 11 to 19 year-olds using it. For his part Breton hasn’t sent a work email in three years. ‘If people want to talk to me, they can come and visit me, call or send me a text message. Emails cannot replace the spoken word.’”

http://slashdot.org/story/11/11/29/0232205/europes-largest-it-company-to-ban-internal-email

Even if you continue to send email, you might find that filing it is a waste of time.

“There are two types of office workers in the world — those who file their emails in folders, and those who use search. Well, it looks like the searchers are smarter. A 354-user study by IBM research found that users who just searched their inbox found emails slightly faster than users who had filed them by folder. Add the time spent filing and the searchers easily come out on top. Apparently the filers are using their inbox as a to-do list rather than wanting to categorize information to find it more easily.”

http://tech.slashdot.org/story/11/10/10/0043217/Putting-Emails-In-Folders-Is-a-Waste-of-Time-Says-IBM-Study

Ie email goes extinct, what’s next? Maybe files.

“Two recent papers, one from Microsoft Research and one from University of Wisconsin (PDF), are providing a refreshing take on rethinking ‘what a file is.’ This could have major implications for the next-gen file system design, and will probably cause a stir among Slashdotters, given that it will affect the programmatic interface. The first paper has some hints as to what went wrong with the previous WinFS approach. Quoting the first paper: ‘For over 40 years the notion of the file, as devised by pioneers in the field of computing, has proved robust and has remained unchallenged. Yet this concept is not a given, but serves as a boundary object between users and engineers. In the current landscape, this boundary is showing signs of slippage, and we propose the boundary object be reconstituted. New abstractions of file are needed, which reflect what users seek to do with their digital data, and which allow engineers to solve the networking, storage and data management problems that ensue when files move from the PC on to the networked world of today. We suggest that one aspect of this adaptation is to encompass metadata within a file abstraction; another has to do what such a shift would mean for enduring user actions such as “copy” and “delete” applicable to the deriving file types. We finish by arguing that there is an especial need to support the notion of “ownership” that adequately serves both users and engineers as they engage with the world of networked sociality. ‘”

http://hardware.slashdot.org/story/11/11/01/1249224/rethinking-the-nature-of-files

The Marine Environmental Research Institute (MERI) is hiring someone with writing, technical and graphics skills at the MERI Center for Marine Studies in Blue Hill, Maine. Meanwhile this Tuesday the Bangor Chamber of Commerce is showcasing business advice from L. L. Bean, Black Dinah Chocolatiers, and yes, Shipyard Brewing Company.

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The New York Times reports on the increasingly frequent–but still very controversial–practice of incorporating Twitter and other “backchannel” communication networks into the classroom. Do such conversations make classes more inclusive or more distracting?

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Your parents probably are more likely to talk nice about family, while you’re probably more likely to cuss about music or sex. And that’s why you’re more likely to be popular on Facebook, according to one read of Facebook’s recent statistical correlation of user comments and number of friends.

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In an age when the Canadian government is muzzling scientists, religious groups are using special search engines like Jewogle to filter out unwanted results, and one in five Americans believes the earth is at the center of the solar system…you might just want to hear Randy Olson speak.

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http://www.treehugger.com/files/2010/01/eco-friendly-mobile-phone-runs-on-coke.php

A bio-battery running on Coke (or another such sugary drink) has the potential to run 3x as long as standard lithium batteries, while being fully biodegradable. Nice!

img1 caption=’A cell phone that runs on Coke.’

http://www.treehugger.com/files/2010/01/eco-friendly-mobile-phone-runs-on-coke.php

A bio-battery running on Coke (or another such sugary drink) has the potential to run 3x as long as standard lithium batteries, while being fully biodegradable. Nice!

img1 caption=’A cell phone that runs on Coke.’

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http://www.treehugger.com/files/2010/01/eco-friendly-mobile-phone-runs-on-coke.php

A bio-battery running on Coke (or another such sugary drink) has the potential to run 3x as long as standard lithium batteries, while being fully biodegradable. Nice!

img1 caption=’A cell phone that runs on Coke.’

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