AndroidHaving trouble reading the news on your Samsung Galaxy while juggling a coffee cup? If you must use your tablet with only one hand, this demo shows users using only their eyes to interact with their tablets.

Plus Microsoft is looking for a few good ideas for Surface apps.

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Bits Projectglass Tmag ArticleAugmented Reality just got a lot more fashionable. That wasn’t hard, as the previous standard was pretty much Geordi La Forge‘s automotive-filter visor.

That said, Google Glass looks pretty serious–like having Siri behind your eyeballs.

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3dThe third dimension isn’t just a Hollywood contrivance for repackaging old movies–it’s cropping up in everything from tablet computers to museum exhibits to Web design.

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The FDA is considering whether to recognize a game aimed at schizophrenics as a “therapeutic drug.” Does that mean you can overdose on GTA? In any case, it’s interesting finally to see a convergence between the two industries that refer to their audience as “users.”

“In what’s believed to be an industry first, a developer has begun talks with the American Food and Drug Administration to get its game recognized as a therapeutic drug. ‘Brain Plasticity has been fine-tuning a game to help people with schizophrenia improve the deficits in attention and memory that are often associated with the disorder. Early next year, they will conduct a study with 150 participants at 15 sites across the country. Participants will play the game for one hour, five times a week over a period of six months. If participants’ quality of life improves at that “dosage,” Brain Plasticity will push ahead with the FDA approval process.’”

http://games.slashdot.org/story/11/09/27/060223/Developer-Seeks-FDA-Approval-For-Therapeutic-Game

Meanwhile, in other virtual health news:

“Rite Aid today announced it is offering virtual face-to-face physician consultations through an in-store kiosk. The virtual consultation services are currently being tested in the Detroit area, but the company expects they will do well and the virtual consults will expand to other regions. The service costs $45 for a 10-minute physician consultation. Consultations with nurses are free.”

http://science.slashdot.org/story/11/09/27/0541231/Rite-Aid-Drug-Stores-Offer-Virtual-Doc-Visits

But wait, there’s more:

They are the two big tech buzzwords of the moment. Now a combination of 3D printing and augmented reality can help researchers design more effective drugs.

At Arthur Olsen’s Molecular Graphics Lab at the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, California, research teams model biological viruses – including HIV – and attempt to work out what kind of proteins and ligand molecules can latch onto them, to see which might inhibit or disable them.

As Olsen shows in this video, 3D printing allows them to create accurate plastic models of virus segments and the potential drug molecules. With smart use of magnets they can be made to self-assemble, too.

But for calculating which drug will likely connect with a receptor area using the least energy, augmented reality comes into play: using small webcam targets on the model virus, they can map it to a computerised model of itself so the researcher can see it move on screen.

(Via Bruce Sterling)

http://www.newscientist.com/blogs/onepercent/2011/10/3d-printed-viruses-meet-their.html

And then there’s Deepak Chopra.

Leela, Deepak Chopra’s debut game for Xbox 360 Kinect and Wii, is part relaxation mechanism, part new age stoner candy.

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/vu3zE2BRepc/

Not be outdone, AT&T wants to wire health care into diapers for the young and old. (Shades of Mike Scott’s wearable computing Friend Finder…)

a growing list of people could benefit from connected clothing, says AT&T, which claims ‘the stars have aligned’ for this technology. Prices of clothing sensors have come down; Wi-Fi and wireless networks have become ubiquitous; and mobile apps have become easier to design and simpler to use. ‘For example, parents of babies could cover them in connected clothing to check on their children when they were out of the house … And relatives of elderly people who are “aging in place” in their homes could check on their vital signs and make sure their loved ones haven’t fallen. This could help the elderly stay out of assisted living facilities, as most prefer to do.’”

http://science.slashdot.org/story/11/11/04/2119205/att-pushes-connected-clothing-for-healthcare

The Bieber Shaver is only one of the works by the artist-hackers of F.A.T. Lab, which also include a fake Google Street Views car and the QR Stenciler mentioned previously on NMDnet.

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Graffiti just got more compact, thanks to Processing, QR codes, and media artist Golan Levin and his pals.

For the uninitiated, QR codes are those pixelated-looking little squares you sometimes see on business cards and posters. Scan ‘em with a smartphone and they reveal a message or send you to a Web site or map. Thanks to QR Stenciler, you may be seeing more of them in unlikely places.

(Via Bruce Sterling)

QR_STENCILER Version: 01 August, 2011 http://fffff.at/qr-stenciler-and-qr-hobo-codes/ By Golan Levin and Asa Foster III for FFFFF.AT

Developed with Processing v.0198, a free, cross- platform Java programming toolkit for the arts. http://www.processing.org

ABOUT This free program loads a user-specified QR code image, from which it generates a topologically correct stencil PDF, suitable for laser-cutting.

INSTRUCTIONS >> QR_STENCILER has been tested in MacOSX 10.6.8. 1. Make a QR code image which embeds a short text. Try GoQR.me, Kaywa, or the Google Chart API. 2. Download and install ‘Processing’ from http://www.processing.org/download We used v.0198 but v.1.5.1 seems OK too. 3. Unzip ‘QR_STENCILER.zip’ to a folder. 4. Put your QR code image in ‘QR_STENCILER/data/’ 5. Launch Processing and open ‘QR_STENCILER.pde’ 6. Press ‘Run’ (Command-R) to start the stenciler. 7. You will be prompted to Open your QR code image. A default will be opened if none is provided. 8. After doing so, the program will generate a stencil PDF in the ‘data’ folder. 9. That PDF can now be opened in your favorite CAD software, for laser-cutting cardboard, etc. 10.After marking your stencil, test it with a QR reader, such as TapMedia’s free iPhone app.

LICENSE

QR_STENCILER shall be used for Good, not Evil….

Camera Article LargeWith the Lytro camera, it’s shoot first, focus later, thanks to a special sensor and software that lets users change the focus on the file itself. These interactive demos suggests how this can add a new dimension of interactivity to otherwise ordinary photographs.

Meanwhile, for moving image mavens, Apple’s Final Cut is reborn at a third the price. Not everyone is pleased with its reincarnation, but most are sure to like the biggest difference: no more waiting for rendering. Yes, you heard that right.

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Street View Giardini 1 9 Master CardThe press release for the exhibition Not Here begins, “The Samek Art Gallery at Bucknell University is very pleased to announce that we will not be presenting the augmented reality artwork of the art collective, MANIFEST.AR from June 4 through November 27, 2011.” It turns out MANIFEST.AR isn’t featured in the Venice Biennale either. Even more of a coincidence: the same works not featured in the Biennale are not featured in the Samek show, during the exact same period!

If you’re confused, blame Augmented Reality: software that allows enterprising artists to overlay virtual versions of their works in real spaces, at least on AR-enabled smartphones. What’s not (here) to like?

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JavaScript and its siblings HTML and CSS have grown from lowly beginnings to become the gateway language to (almost) everything new media. Linux and Augmented Reality are the latest to succumb to the “JavaScript everywhere” trend.

Yes Virginia, That Is Linux Running on JavaScript http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/k9zWnzmLxOE/ Wired News: Top Stories Thanks to today’s web browsers, JavaScript has become a very powerful language. Powerful enough to run Linux inside your web browser.

This new framework from Wikitude would have sure come in handy for some of last year’s AR-based NMD capstones.

Augmented Reality: Wikitude ARchitect http://www.wikitude.org/architect (Via Bruce Sterling)

Whenever we looked at Augmented Reality (AR) content platforms, we have always found them far too restrictive for AR content developers. They all offer a handful of features, which often limit the creative ideas AR content developers have. So we at Wikitude thought, “that’s not ideal, we need to change this, and we need to change this NOW!”

Consider this, when developing a webpage, would you be satisfied with only a handful of features especially if you knew there were powerful concepts like HTML, JavaScript and CSS were available which could make your life so much easier, but the web browser forces you to stick to the few features it offers you? We at Wikitude guess you wouldn’t. So, why should you accept this on Augmented Reality Browsers?

We asked ourselves this question a few months ago…..and created ARchitect!

ARchitect – a new way of creating Augmented Reality experiences

The Wikitude ARchitect is an Augmented Reality JavaScript Framework, embedded in a HTML web view which sits on top of the Wikitude camera view and allows developers to control the objects in the camera view. And when I say JavaScript, I don’t mean just another JSON object definition language, I’m really talking about the entire power of the JavaScript language. And when I say HTML, I don’t mean just a special div that can be placed at a predefined spot – nope, it’s the entire HTML specification that will be supported in Wikitude ARchitect. No exceptions, whatever is possible in an ordinary web browser will also be do-able in ARchitect. Promise!

Geolocation drawings by YOU! Concepts behind ARchitect

The three key concepts for us when designing the ARchitect were: 1) Developers shouldn’t be required to learn new concepts or tools. 2) The ARchitect should be very simple to get into, do something meaningful with only a few lines of code. 3) And yet, it should be massively powerful and flexible to create highly complex AR applications.

As we tried out various ideas to achieve these goals, it was rather obvious that HTML in combination with JavaScript was the best way to go!

HTML and JavaScript is all you need to know

Now, let’s have a look at the internals. (((Yes let’s!)))) The Wikitude ARchitect basically consists of two major parts. First, we have the HTML which is placed on top of the camera view. Typically, HTML will contain data which will not move with the user but remain on the screen, whatever the user is looking at. Examples of this would be status and progress bars or an inventory management in an AR game – basically, a heads up display. No additional skills required, it’s HTML with all the associated tools, like CSS or JavaScript, if you know how to create a webpage, you are ready to start developing with the ARchitect!

Second, the heart of ARchitect is the JavaScript library which ties deeply into the application and allows manipulation of the AR objects on the screen. Essentially, you can create virtual objects on the fly, create, place and modify Drawables visualizing the object or react on certain events, for example when an object comes in the field of vision, or when the user comes close to a certain location, and even execute a function you can specify.

Animations by YOU You can animate the objects and their visualizations, make them rotate, scale, disappear, … It’s totally up to you! Play sounds and videos, do network interaction, create interactive games, even with network multiplayer mode, let your phone vibrate, and much much more! With the ARchitect, you finally have a powerful tool in your hand to create incredible, mind-blowing AR applications!

The sky is the limit – realize your ideas

NEW YORK CITY,  19 Nov 2010 —

MYFOXNY.COM – Some might say there is a ‘war on cars’ going on in New York City.
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Two recent visions suggest that Augmented Reality in the wild could be more fun than the portable shopping mall promised by most AR startups. Mattias Wozniak and Bjorn Svensson’s design concept of an AR visor lets users play a virtual game with other passersby, like bouncing a virtual ball against a bus stop. Not to be outdone, zoologists have figured out how to keep their eye on the ball–er, zebra–by tracking its stripes like a barcode.

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Anonymous video artists have projected onto the Maine State House the mural by artist Judy Taylor originally installed to commemorate Maine’s labor history. The mural’s removal by Maine’s new governor Paul LePage has provoked outcries of censorship from artists and educators.

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So we know from NMDnet that cell phones are privacy disasters–but what are they good at? How about detecting cancer, getting drivers out of speeding tickets, and blowing up terrorists, for starters?

http://mobile.slashdot.org/story/11/03/11/1847248/Smartphone-Device-Detects-Cancer-In-an-Hour?from=rss via Byline

“Scientists at the Center for Systems Biology at Massachusetts General Hospital have integrated a microNMR device that accurately detects cancer cells and integrates with a smartphone (abstract). Though just a prototype, this device enables a clinician to extract small amounts of cells from a mass inside of a patient, analyze the sample on the spot, acquire the results in an hour, and pass the results to other clinicians and into medical records rapidly. How much does the device cost to make? $200. Seriously, smartphones just got their own Samuel L. Jackson-esque wallet.” Reader Stoobalou points out other cancer-related news that Norwegian researchers have found a group of genes that increase a person’s risk to develop lung cancer.

Of course, cell phones have also been accused of causing cancer. Well, how about getting out of a speeding ticket?

http://yro.slashdot.org/story/11/02/26/021218/Smart-Phone-Gets-Driver-Out-of-a-Speeding-Ticket?from=rss

“Sahas Katta writes in Skattertech that a traffic cop pulled him over while driving home and gave him a speeding ticket but thanks to his Android, he ended up walking out of traffic court without having to pay a fine or adding a single point to his record. “I fortunately happened to have Google Tracks running when an officer cited me for speeding while heading back home from a friend’s place,” writes Katta. “The speed limit in the area was a mere 25 miles per hour and the cop’s radar gun shockingly clocked me driving over 40 miles per hour.” Once in court Katta asked the officer the last time he attended radar gun training, when the device was last calibrated, or the unit’s model number — none of which the officer could answer. “I then presented my time stamped GPS data with details about my average moving speed and maximum speed during my short drive home. Both numbers were well within the posted speed limits,” says Katta. “The judge took a moment and declared that I was not guilty, but he had an unusual statement that followed. To avoid any misinterpretations about his ruling, he chose to clarify his decision by citing the lack of evidence on the officer’s part. He mentioned that he was not familiar enough with GPS technology to make a decision based on my evidence, but I can’t help but imagine that it was an important factor.”"

Not impressed? How about the ability to blow up suicide bombers before they get to you ?

http://idle.slashdot.org/story/11/01/28/1228241/Spam-Text-Prematurely-Blows-Up-Suicide-Bomber?from=rss via Byline

“A suicide bomber’s plan to detonate explosives in Central Moscow on New Year’s Eve was foiled when she received an unexpected spam text message that caused her deadly payload to blow up too early. A message wishing her a happy new year came hours before the unnamed woman was to set off her suicide belt near Red Square, an act of terrorism that could have killed hundreds of people. Islamist terrorists in Russia often use mobile phones as detonators. The bomber’s handler, who is usually watching his charge, sends the bomber a text message to set off the explosive belt at the moment when it is thought they can inflict maximum casualties.”

How to keep these apps from wasting your phone battery? Throw one of these in your backpack.

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/6k03KlR8C0w/ via Byline

Put this tubular object in your backpack, and you can generate juice for your cellphone — just by walking around.

So many mobile apps are just dumbed-down versions of better applications. Here’s a really useful app that puts the smart back in smartphone.

http://feeds.nytimes.com/click.phdo?i=bb16496f6dc04018e00abd0a435a1873 via Byline

A new iPhone application is designed to help blind people identify United States currency in real time by speaking the denomination aloud.

Sometimes less is more, even in Augmented Reality. These two examples of “diminished reality” are like Photoshop’s Content Aware Fill acting on real-time video. Imagine if Harry Houdini had gotten ahold of this, or Pravda.

http://tech.slashdot.org/story/10/10/13/0525245/Erasing-Objects-From-Video-In-Real-Time?from=rss

Smoothly interpolating away objects in still pictures is impressive enough, but reader geoffbrecker writes with a stunning demonstration from Germany’s Technical University of Ilmenau of on-the-fly erasure of selected objects in video. Quoting: “The effect is achieved by an image synthesizer that reduces the image quality, removes the object, and then increases the image quality back up. This all happens within 40 milliseconds, fast enough that the viewer doesn’t notice any delay.”

Here’s the “ordinary” AR version:

http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2010/10/augmented-reality-the-incredible-world-of-diminished-reality/

Alberti would have had an aneurysm if he had seen this Augmented Perspective.

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At least if your surgeon is using this new augmented reality viewer.

I’m afraid the soothing music doesn’t make up for the creepy video.

http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2010/08/augmented-reality-osirix-surgery/ via Byline

“We applied mixed reality (MR) consist of virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) technology, in which electronically-generated dynamic 3D images are superimposed on the actual space in front of the surgeon, on the patient’s operative field or the surface of the abdomen, and evaluated such a system as a reference for surgical navigation and education.

“First we performed MDCT and generated anatomical VR imaging using DICOM viewer OsiriX and previewed on the patient body surface of the operative field from the projector as MR navigation. (((”Previewed on the patient body surface” A-OK remark for 2010)))

“Our image overlay surgical navigation system OsiriX provided accurate image guided navigation for minimally invasive surgery.”

via @kurakura

Flash and 3d vector overlays would seem to be a no brainer for the AR market. If Adobe had pushed this out the door sooner it might have contributed pressure on Apple to enable Flash on its handhelds.

http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2010/07/augmented-reality-earthmine-sdk-for-flash/

“The earthmine SDK for Flash provides developers with the ability to create immersive, detailed, and spatially accurate street level 3D experiences using the Adobe Flash, Flex and AIR frameworks providing for a variety of deployment options. Create and display contextually relevant information about places by attaching overlays to real-world objects and features in 3D space.”

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Another DIY AR toolkit. I wonder if it comes with that sophisticated European accent built-in–it does vaguely sound computer-generated.

http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2010/07/augmented-reality-hoppala/ via Byline

*I do hope! they! get rid of! that exclamation point! soon.

“HOPPALA! Augmentation provides an easy way for non-technical creatives to start experimenting with augmented reality and Layar. Create your own augmented reality experiences with just some mouse clicks and publish your work at Layar, the world‘s largest augmented reality platform.

“HOPPALA! Augmentation comes with a full screen map interface to place and edit augments all around the world. Upload your images and icons, audio, video and 3D multimedia content with just some mouse clicks and add it to your personalized inventory in the cloud. HOPPALA! Augmentation even does the hosting for you. It simply runs in your browser, there’s no software installation required and no coding needed at all.

“HOPPALA! Augmentation is your perfect Layar companion. It offers a fullservice solution for producing augmented reality experiences and easily integrates with the Layar open platform. Create and maintain your content at HOPPALA! Augmentation and publish cross-platform at Layar. Layar is available for iPhone and Android smartphones with more than 2 mio. installations worldwide and preinstallations on 1 in 3 AR capable smartphones sold worldwide this year.

“Try HOPPALA! Augmentation for free and learn more about HOPPALA! Augmentation in our video tutorial.”

(((At least they didn’t name the enterprise “H0pp0la.” The thing I like best about Hoppola! (besides the fact that it makes AR accessible to bone-lazy dilettantes), is that it resembles an augmented reality system for building augmented realities. With “no software installation required and with no coding needed at all,” it may be a mere matter of time before we can augment reality by snapping our fingers at it.)))

Another DIY AR toolkit. I wonder if it comes with that sophisticated European accent built-in–it does vaguely sound computer-generated.

http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2010/07/augmented-reality-hoppala/ via Byline

*I do hope! they! get rid of! that exclamation point! soon.

“HOPPALA! Augmentation provides an easy way for non-technical creatives to start experimenting with augmented reality and Layar. Create your own augmented reality experiences with just some mouse clicks and publish your work at Layar, the world‘s largest augmented reality platform.

“HOPPALA! Augmentation comes with a full screen map interface to place and edit augments all around the world. Upload your images and icons, audio, video and 3D multimedia content with just some mouse clicks and add it to your personalized inventory in the cloud. HOPPALA! Augmentation even does the hosting for you. It simply runs in your browser, there’s no software installation required and no coding needed at all.

“HOPPALA! Augmentation is your perfect Layar companion. It offers a fullservice solution for producing augmented reality experiences and easily integrates with the Layar open platform. Create and maintain your content at HOPPALA! Augmentation and publish cross-platform at Layar. Layar is available for iPhone and Android smartphones with more than 2 mio. installations worldwide and preinstallations on 1 in 3 AR capable smartphones sold worldwide this year.

“Try HOPPALA! Augmentation for free and learn more about HOPPALA! Augmentation in our video tutorial.”

(((At least they didn’t name the enterprise “H0pp0la.” The thing I like best about Hoppola! (besides the fact that it makes AR accessible to bone-lazy dilettantes), is that it resembles an augmented reality system for building augmented realities. With “no software installation required and with no coding needed at all,” it may be a mere matter of time before we can augment reality by snapping our fingers at it.)))

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