CorvetteSummer may be over, but there’s still time to get some action footage while the weather’s nice. Wired reviews your options for point-of-view cameras–and yes, shows an electric skateboard holding its own against a Corvette.

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Recruit Talent illNow that one of the world’s foremost authorities on economic development declares capitalism “superseded by creativity and the ability to innovate,” it’s a good time for designers to find work. Here are some recommendations for getting seen and getting paid.

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Photo by Adobe ShadowWho’s got the right strategy for uniting content across desktop and mobile devices? (And who’s utterly failing?)

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The average new media student might hesitate to rent just one application at Adobe’s asking price. But Adobe’s throwing in all its apps, plus the ability to swap work on your project from mobile to desktop application with all changes stored in the cloud.

Adobe is making a big splash into the cloud with its Creative Cloud service, launching an enhanced online version of its sought-after Adobe Creative Suite for $50 a month on a one-year contract….

Adobe Touch Apps. Capture and iterate on your idea on your iPad or Android tablet and then sync your work to your Creative Suite desktop application, where you can refine your design.

http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/index/~3/y_yOSoQSiac/

The biting video promo for “Fotoshop by Adobé” (pronounced a-do-BEY) imagines the popular image editor marketed by Revlon et al. The scary thing is how close the video is to reality.

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Is that guy in the weight-loss ad really as buff as he looks? How far can you enhance that snapshot for the school newspaper and still have it represent reality? This software tool rates photographs on how far they have been manipulated.

The photographs of celebrities and models in fashion advertisements and magazines are routinely buffed with a helping of digital polish. The retouching can be slight — colors brightened, a stray hair put in place, a pimple healed. Or it can be drastic — shedding 10 or 20 pounds, adding a few inches in height and erasing all wrinkles and blemishes, done using Adobe’s Photoshop software, the photo retoucher’s magic wand.

“Fix one thing, then another and pretty soon you end up with Barbie,” said Hany Farid, a professor of computer science and a digital forensics expert at Dartmouth.

And that is a problem, feminist legislators in France, Britain and Norway say, and they want digitally altered photos to be labeled. In June, the American Medical Association adopted a policy on body image and advertising that urged advertisers and others to “discourage the altering of photographs in a manner that could promote unrealistic expectations of appropriate body image.”

Dr. Farid said he became intrigued by the problem after reading about the photo-labeling proposals in Europe. Categorizing photos as either altered or not altered seemed too blunt an approach, he said.

Dr. Farid and Eric Kee, a Ph.D. student in computer science at Dartmouth, are proposing a software tool for measuring how much fashion and beauty photos have been altered, a 1-to-5 scale that distinguishes the infinitesimal from the fantastic. Their research is being published this week in a scholarly journal, The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences….

From left to right, photographs show the five levels of retouching….The effect, from slight to drastic, may discourage retouching. “Models, for example, might well say, ‘I don’t want to be a 5. I want to be a 1,’ ” he said.

http://feeds.nytimes.com/click.phdo?i=ef370676c5e736ec41a3325885e56f55

:excerptstart Microsoft has unveiled Windows 8, redesigned to function on a variety of mobile and desktop platforms and compete with Android and iOS. There are a couple of things conspicuously absent.

“Earlier this morning, at the Build Windows conference in Anaheim, California, Microsoft made it patently clear that ‘To the cloud!’ is not merely a throwaway phrase: it is the entire future of the company. Every single one of Microsoft’s services, platforms, and form factors will now begin its hasty, leave-no-prisoners-behind transition to the always-on, internet-connected cloud.” netbuzz pointed out that even the famous Blue Screen of Death will get a new look. “Lastly mikejuk writes: While everyone else is looking at the surface detail of Windows 8 there are some deep changes going on. Perhaps the biggest is that Metro now provides an alternative environment that doesn’t use the age old Win32 API. This means no more overlapping windows — yes Metro really does take the windows out of Windows.”

http://tech.slashdot.org/story/11/09/14/2219226/Windows-8-Roundup

Meanwhile, prospects for Flash are looking increasingly less flashy.

“The Microsoft Windows Engineering Team has announced that the Metro interface web browser in Windows 8 will not support plug-ins — Adobe Flash included. Users will still be able to open a traditional browser interface to make use of legacy sites that rely upon plug-ins. This news follows a recent blog post by the Internet Explorer 10 team pushing the use of HTML5 video as a replacement to Flash video. With Google, Apple, Mozilla, Opera and other major players already backing HTML5 — is Adobe Flash finally dead?”

http://news.slashdot.org/story/11/09/15/1257249/Windows-8-Wont-Support-Plug-Ins-the-End-of-Flash

Wired reports on a development that suggests Adobe may be ceding ground in the Flash versus HTML 5 competition:

Adobe wants to bring fancy, magazine-style layout tools to web design and the company is turning to web standard to make it happen.

Regions can be both positive and negative space. In other words, you can write CSS rules to flow text into a region — say, as below, a pie graph — or around a region (as in the image of Arches National Park at the top of this post).

Lest you think that Adobe is simply trying to improve the web — which may well be true — nevertheless, it’s worth bearing in mind Adobe’s own agenda. We suspect it’s no accident that the company has used WebKit to power the CSS Regions testing browser. WebKit is, after all, the engine that powers the iPad’s web browser.

With Apple banning Flash from its iOS devices, Adobe has little in the way of iPad-friendly tools to offer its big magazine clients. Given that publishers are betting heavily on the iPad’s ability to save their business model, the more iPad tools Adobe can offer, the happier magazine publishers will be. By rolling CSS Regions into WebKit for a demo, Adobe is already one step closer to a toe-hold on iOS devices.

Yes, it’s only Flash video, and then only because a third-party app converts it to HTML5 first. But this could be the first chink in the great Flashwall of Apple.

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I can’t turn up any solid references, but it has always been my suspicion that Adobe is creating an operating system (Adobe OS?). Anyone that’s used their CS suite over the last couple years probably notices the trend away from the native operating system look/feel towards a different, mostly gray, and those wierd side-bar-kinda-pop-out aesthetic.

It looks like Adobe may have their chance to break into the OS market… sort of. Rumor is, Microsoft will buy Adobe, at least according to a Google News search and some Twitter buz [nb, link shelf life].

I like where Windows has headed with Windows 7. I don’t like where CS has gone, especially on Windows. Curious what a mash-up might be like.

Stable report at:
http://www.thestreet.com/story/10883012/1/fast-money-recap-microsofts-rumored-bid.html?cm_ven=GOOGLEN

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Why you still should master Photoshop even if you’re planning a life of crime.

http://idle.slashdot.org/story/10/07/20/1532237/Criminal-Photoshops-Himself-Into-Charity-Photos-In-Bid-For-Leniency?from=rss via Byline

38-year-old Daryl Simon decided it would be a good idea to submit fake pictures of himself at charity events, and forged letters of support from various charitable organizations to the court before he was sentenced for credit card fraud. Unfortunately for Daryl, he is as good at Photoshop as he is at credit card scams, and Judge Stephen Robinson was not amused. Simon was sentenced to 285-months in prison — 50 months more than the maximum under sentencing guidelines. From the article: “Daryl Simon’s bald-faced move included sticking a picture of himself into a shot with a physical-therapy patient, then flipping the image and placing it next to a teen student. ‘Evidence that his image was inserted and flipped can be seen by examining the single detail on his shirt above his fingers — that detail appears on the left side of the shirt in the top photograph, and on the right side of the shirt in the bottom photograph,’ prosecutors wrote.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Why you still should master Photoshop even if you’re planning a life of crime.

http://idle.slashdot.org/story/10/07/20/1532237/Criminal-Photoshops-Himself-Into-Charity-Photos-In-Bid-For-Leniency?from=rss via Byline

38-year-old Daryl Simon decided it would be a good idea to submit fake pictures of himself at charity events, and forged letters of support from various charitable organizations to the court before he was sentenced for credit card fraud. Unfortunately for Daryl, he is as good at Photoshop as he is at credit card scams, and Judge Stephen Robinson was not amused. Simon was sentenced to 285-months in prison — 50 months more than the maximum under sentencing guidelines. From the article: “Daryl Simon’s bald-faced move included sticking a picture of himself into a shot with a physical-therapy patient, then flipping the image and placing it next to a teen student. ‘Evidence that his image was inserted and flipped can be seen by examining the single detail on his shirt above his fingers — that detail appears on the left side of the shirt in the top photograph, and on the right side of the shirt in the bottom photograph,’ prosecutors wrote.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Charlie Stross argues that Steve Jobs’ recent fascistic turn — such as his refusal to run Flash on the iPhone — is a side effect of Jobs’ planning for the coming decline in personal computer sales.

According to Stross, the market will be all about mobility. Apple will turn from selling hardware that runs its software to selling hardware that runs its cloud.

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“If you’re looking for reasons to upgrade to Photoshop CS5 when it arrives, a new demo video might just persuade you. Narrated by Bryan O’Neil-Hughes, a product manager on the Photoshop team, the video shows the new content-aware fill tool, which has the potential to revolutionise the way you clean up photos. If you’re not happy with an item in your picture, select it, delete it, and Photoshop will analyse the surrounding area and plug the gap as if it never existed.”

http://tech.slashdot.org/story/10/03/24/1725246/Photoshop-CS5s-Showpiece-mdash-Content-Aware-Fill?from=rss&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Slashdot%2Fslashdot+%28Slashdot%29

“If you’re looking for reasons to upgrade to Photoshop CS5 when it arrives, a new demo video might just persuade you. Narrated by Bryan O’Neil-Hughes, a product manager on the Photoshop team, the video shows the new content-aware fill tool, which has the potential to revolutionise the way you clean up photos. If you’re not happy with an item in your picture, select it, delete it, and Photoshop will analyse the surrounding area and plug the gap as if it never existed.”

http://tech.slashdot.org/story/10/03/24/1725246/Photoshop-CS5s-Showpiece-mdash-Content-Aware-Fill?from=rss&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Slashdot%2Fslashdot+%28Slashdot%29

Somehow people have the feeling that PDF is some innocent image format…

Just hours before Adobe is slated to deliver the latest patches for its popular PDF viewer, ScanSafe announced that by its counting, malicious Adobe Reader documents made up 80% of all exploits at the end of 2009.

http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/9MiQjsbAEBU/Rogue-PDFs-Behind-80-of-Exploits-In-Q4-09

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Somehow people have the feeling that PDF is some innocent image format…

Just hours before Adobe is slated to deliver the latest patches for its popular PDF viewer, ScanSafe announced that by its counting, malicious Adobe Reader documents made up 80% of all exploits at the end of 2009.

http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/9MiQjsbAEBU/Rogue-PDFs-Behind-80-of-Exploits-In-Q4-09

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