AndroidHaving trouble reading the news on your Samsung Galaxy while juggling a coffee cup? If you must use your tablet with only one hand, this demo shows users using only their eyes to interact with their tablets.

Plus Microsoft is looking for a few good ideas for Surface apps.

Gaze-controlling an Android tablet | Beyond The Beyond | Wired.com

“This video shows a demo of the Docomo eye-control for tablets. The idea is to allow users to perform actions while using the tablet with only one hand (in the subway, or other such situations). This could also help impaired people one day.”

You may be focused on the upcoming iPad Mini launch, but the other tablet makers are eager to get your attention too. For instance, Microsoft’s new Surface tablet won’t run older Windows apps, which has inspired Microsoft to lure college kids to internships based on programming prototype apps for its new platforms. Given that Windows 8 is supposed to enable HTML5 apps, this might be another use for your training in the New Media department’s Baseline Language.

Microsoft Deploys College-Kid Cool in Windows 8 Apps Race: Tech – Businessweek

Windows 8 is the first Microsoft operating system that will work on computers running chips based on ARM Holdings Plc (ARM) technology. These chips are widely used in mobile devices, including the iPad. The ARM-based products will run only apps designed specifically for the new version of Windows — and none of the programs already available for Microsoft software on machines made for Intel Corp. (INTC)’s chips.

“Microsoft is definitely playing catch-up with respect to the global app marketplace,” said David Hilal, an analyst at FBR Capital Markets, in an interview. “Their challenge is a chicken-and-egg problem. They need to get more users for their apps to entice developers, but they need better apps to attract more users.”

Enter NERD interns to help fill the void. This summer’s group of 21 interns produced three apps already in the Windows store, and two more that are expected to follow soon.

One of the intern-built apps is Trackage, which enables users to locate packages shipped by FedEx Corp. (FDX), United Parcel Service Inc. (UPS), the U.S. Postal Service and LaserShip Inc. using a single app rather than having to go to each service’s website separately. Another, Never Late, is an alarm clock app.

In case coding a package-tracking app doesn’t sound like your idea of a summer vacation, some of the interns seem to have had a little more fun with their app ideas. Players of Inkarus, for example, “collect gears and feathers to help a chubby penguin build a flying machine that must steer clear of things like antigravity fields and rainstorms.”

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