education

“TorrentFreak reports that Warner Brothers UK is hiring college students with an IT background to participate in an internship that will pit them against pirates on the world wide web in an effort to crack down on illegal digital distribution. The intern will literally be on the front-lines of the epic battle against pirated content, ensnaring users in incriminating transactions, issuing takedown requests, and causing general frustration amongst the file-sharing population on the Internet.”

http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/N2vEa2Qy6Bo/Warner-Brothers-Hiring-Undercover-Anti-Pirates

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education

“TorrentFreak reports that Warner Brothers UK is hiring college students with an IT background to participate in an internship that will pit them against pirates on the world wide web in an effort to crack down on illegal digital distribution. The intern will literally be on the front-lines of the epic battle against pirated content, ensnaring users in incriminating transactions, issuing takedown requests, and causing general frustration amongst the file-sharing population on the Internet.”

http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/N2vEa2Qy6Bo/Warner-Brothers-Hiring-Undercover-Anti-Pirates

LACE’s archives are an invaluable site of cultural history for Los Angeles, as LACE has been a crucial participant in the city’s artistic production for over three decades, often housing artwork that is experimental in nature. This LACE Archives Internship is an opportunity to work with LACE’s unique collections, which include documentation of art exhibitions and performances held at LACE since 1978, extensive holdings of photographic and video material and records pertaining to the institution’s history.

The LACE Archives Internship will provide an interested individual with the opportunity to gain training and experience working with archival collections. In addition to providing training in widely held standards and protocol of collections management, it also offers a unique introduction to working with collections related to experimental and variable media art. The Archives Intern will: – Learn first-hand about collections-management issues and make use of an extensive database specifically designed by Franklin Furnace Archive to meet the needs of collections of conceptual and other variable media art; – Learn about ways that archival collections are made publicly accessible and work with the LACE Archives Fellow to integrate the catalogue of LACE’s holdings into searchable online databases; – Process a variety of material from LACE’s recent exhibitions and events (e.g. photographs, video, press clippings, correspondence), attending to preservation concerns and updating the archives database as needed; – Respond to research inquiries about LACE’s archive and facilitate the use of collections by LACE staff members and visiting scholars and artists; – Digitize selected items from LACE’s collections, including videos, slides and printed matter; – Work with the LACE Archives Fellow to develop online resources that will provide broad access to, and contextualization of LACE’s digitized collections, including project-specific and thematic websites; – Think creatively about how to generate broad interest in LACE’s archival collections; and – Serve as a liaison with LACE’s webmaster to facilitate the integration of documents from the archive into LACE’s website. Application instructions: Send a resume, references, and a cover letter explaining the reasons for your interest in this position to: Jennifer Flores Sternad at jennifer [AT] welcometolace [DOT] org

LACE internships require a commitment of approx. 16 hours per week for a minimum of three months. For further information, please contact Jennifer via e-mail or at (323) 957-1777 x 11. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

http://www.idealist.org/if/i/en/av/Internship/150335-235

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LACE’s archives are an invaluable site of cultural history for Los Angeles, as LACE has been a crucial participant in the city’s artistic production for over three decades, often housing artwork that is experimental in nature. This LACE Archives Internship is an opportunity to work with LACE’s unique collections, which include documentation of art exhibitions and performances held at LACE since 1978, extensive holdings of photographic and video material and records pertaining to the institution’s history.

The LACE Archives Internship will provide an interested individual with the opportunity to gain training and experience working with archival collections. In addition to providing training in widely held standards and protocol of collections management, it also offers a unique introduction to working with collections related to experimental and variable media art. The Archives Intern will: – Learn first-hand about collections-management issues and make use of an extensive database specifically designed by Franklin Furnace Archive to meet the needs of collections of conceptual and other variable media art; – Learn about ways that archival collections are made publicly accessible and work with the LACE Archives Fellow to integrate the catalogue of LACE’s holdings into searchable online databases; – Process a variety of material from LACE’s recent exhibitions and events (e.g. photographs, video, press clippings, correspondence), attending to preservation concerns and updating the archives database as needed; – Respond to research inquiries about LACE’s archive and facilitate the use of collections by LACE staff members and visiting scholars and artists; – Digitize selected items from LACE’s collections, including videos, slides and printed matter; – Work with the LACE Archives Fellow to develop online resources that will provide broad access to, and contextualization of LACE’s digitized collections, including project-specific and thematic websites; – Think creatively about how to generate broad interest in LACE’s archival collections; and – Serve as a liaison with LACE’s webmaster to facilitate the integration of documents from the archive into LACE’s website. Application instructions: Send a resume, references, and a cover letter explaining the reasons for your interest in this position to: Jennifer Flores Sternad at jennifer [AT] welcometolace [DOT] org

LACE internships require a commitment of approx. 16 hours per week for a minimum of three months. For further information, please contact Jennifer via e-mail or at (323) 957-1777 x 11. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

http://www.idealist.org/if/i/en/av/Internship/150335-235

For those that golf at Sunnyvale Municipal Golf Course in Silicon Valley this is old news, but an interesting discovery for the rest of us:  in the middle of the course are runway approach lights for the adjacent Moffett Field. Continue reading »

I am working on building a website for my senior capstone and I need your help.
It is a free website that offers young musicians and professionals to have a place to post their original/non-copyrighted scores of music through educational/instructional videos as well as written score sheets. This site is geared towards having users teaching and helping users learn all things related to the musical instrument. The goal of this site is to have you, the user, provide the content. It is important users on this site come to the aid others, give a sense of a supportive community, so they can learn the art and joy of music. Anyone is allowed to view the videos, score sheets, and add comments. However, you must have a user account in order to upload content.

I am looking for users, who right now, have prior knowledge of music and are able to contribute these instrument educational videos.These videos do not have to be long. Keep the videos to less then 10 minutes. I would like my users to teach how to play an instrument that they feel they are strongest in. You can demonstrate the instrument of your choosing. It can cover the basics of playing that instrument, or it can be more challenging lessons for those users who want to push their talents further. As long as it is relevant to the instrument. You could even show them how to read the music for that instrument, how to keep time, or even how to write music for that instrument. As you can see, the possibilities of what to show users is endless. Also if you don’t have a lot of time just adding 1 video would be extremely helpful and then you can contribute at your own pace. If you need more information I would be happy to help.

MusiciansUniteForFree.com

Web Info:
www.JesseMelanson.com

http://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Projectionist/369893803812?ref=ts

Upcoming:
MARCH 25TH -W/HANG TIME 9PM, THE DIME OLD TOWN MAINE

APRIL 1ST – “MAINE CHANNEL FILM FESTIVAL” 7PM, COLLINS CENTER OF THE ARTS UNIVERSITY OF MAINE

APRIL 3RD – W/BOOTIDDY, THE DIME OLD TOWN MAINE

APRIL 14TH – “CUGR” LARGE CROWD INTERACTION PRESENTATION AND PERFORMANCE WELLS CONFERENCE CENTER, UNIVERSITY OF MAINE

APRIL 30TH – RESTLESS GROOVE CD RELEASE PARTY, THE DIME OLD TOWN MAINE

SEPTEMBER 10TH -12TH – DANK FEST, ACTION MAINE MORE INFO SOON

MORE DATES TO BE ANNOUNCED SOON

“If you’re looking for reasons to upgrade to Photoshop CS5 when it arrives, a new demo video might just persuade you. Narrated by Bryan O’Neil-Hughes, a product manager on the Photoshop team, the video shows the new content-aware fill tool, which has the potential to revolutionise the way you clean up photos. If you’re not happy with an item in your picture, select it, delete it, and Photoshop will analyse the surrounding area and plug the gap as if it never existed.”

http://tech.slashdot.org/story/10/03/24/1725246/Photoshop-CS5s-Showpiece-mdash-Content-Aware-Fill?from=rss&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Slashdot%2Fslashdot+%28Slashdot%29

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“If you’re looking for reasons to upgrade to Photoshop CS5 when it arrives, a new demo video might just persuade you. Narrated by Bryan O’Neil-Hughes, a product manager on the Photoshop team, the video shows the new content-aware fill tool, which has the potential to revolutionise the way you clean up photos. If you’re not happy with an item in your picture, select it, delete it, and Photoshop will analyse the surrounding area and plug the gap as if it never existed.”

http://tech.slashdot.org/story/10/03/24/1725246/Photoshop-CS5s-Showpiece-mdash-Content-Aware-Fill?from=rss&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Slashdot%2Fslashdot+%28Slashdot%29

Gone are the days when all a failing dot-com could take from you was the copper in the walls. MySpace is now selling off your personal info.

Continue reading »

Slashdot reports on a half-dozen universities where teachers are banning laptops from their classes.

The Washington Post reports that professors have banned laptops from their classrooms at George Washington University, American University, the College of William and Mary, and the University of Virginia, among many others, compelling students to take notes the way their parents did: on paper. A generation ago, academia embraced the laptop as the most welcome classroom innovation since the ballpoint pen, but during the past decade it has evolved into a powerful distraction as wireless Internet connections tempt students away from note-typing to e-mail, blogs, YouTube videos, sports scores, even online gaming. Even when used as glorified typewriters, laptops can turn students into witless stenographers, typing a lecture verbatim without listening or understanding. ‘The breaking point for me was when I asked a student to comment on an issue, and he said, “Wait a minute, I want to open my computer,”‘ says David Goldfrank, a Georgetown history professor. ‘And I told him, “I don’t want to know what’s in your computer. I want to know what’s in your head.”‘ Some students don’t agree with the ban. A student wrote in the University of Denver’s newspaper: ‘The fact that some students misuse technology is no reason to ban it. After all, how many professors ban pens and notebooks after noticing students doodling in the margins?’

(Confession: I was one of those students who made elaborate drawings in the margins–though I seem to recall a study arguing that increased mental retention ;)

Clearly the number of distractions has proliferated since laptops were originally introduced in classrooms. More significantly from my point of view, deliberate efforts to integrate laptops, iPhones, and the rest into the classroom haven’t kept pace. It’s hard for me not to assign some blame to the professors here, who seem caught in outdated models of teaching.

Case in point:

Just last week, a colleague of [Georgetown professor David] Cole’s unwittingly demonstrated how thoroughly the Internet has colonized the classroom. When Professor Peter Tague told students a canard about Supreme Court Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. stepping down, students promptly spread the news into the blogosphere. Later in class, Tague revealed that the tip was false, part of a lesson on credibility, according to the blog Above the Law.

Was this a lesson about the undue credibility students attach to blogs, or about the undue credibility they attach to professors?

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Slashdot reports on a half-dozen universities where teachers are banning laptops from their classes.

The Washington Post reports that professors have banned laptops from their classrooms at George Washington University, American University, the College of William and Mary, and the University of Virginia, among many others, compelling students to take notes the way their parents did: on paper. A generation ago, academia embraced the laptop as the most welcome classroom innovation since the ballpoint pen, but during the past decade it has evolved into a powerful distraction as wireless Internet connections tempt students away from note-typing to e-mail, blogs, YouTube videos, sports scores, even online gaming. Even when used as glorified typewriters, laptops can turn students into witless stenographers, typing a lecture verbatim without listening or understanding. ‘The breaking point for me was when I asked a student to comment on an issue, and he said, “Wait a minute, I want to open my computer,”‘ says David Goldfrank, a Georgetown history professor. ‘And I told him, “I don’t want to know what’s in your computer. I want to know what’s in your head.”‘ Some students don’t agree with the ban. A student wrote in the University of Denver’s newspaper: ‘The fact that some students misuse technology is no reason to ban it. After all, how many professors ban pens and notebooks after noticing students doodling in the margins?’

(Confession: I was one of those students who made elaborate drawings in the margins–though I seem to recall a study arguing that increased mental retention ;)

Clearly the number of distractions has proliferated since laptops were originally introduced in classrooms. More significantly from my point of view, deliberate efforts to integrate laptops, iPhones, and the rest into the classroom haven’t kept pace. It’s hard for me not to assign some blame to the professors here, who seem caught in outdated models of teaching.

Case in point:

Just last week, a colleague of [Georgetown professor David] Cole’s unwittingly demonstrated how thoroughly the Internet has colonized the classroom. When Professor Peter Tague told students a canard about Supreme Court Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. stepping down, students promptly spread the news into the blogosphere. Later in class, Tague revealed that the tip was false, part of a lesson on credibility, according to the blog Above the Law.

Was this a lesson about the undue credibility students attach to blogs, or about the undue credibility they attach to professors?

The ‘pre-distressed antique futurity’. William Gibson wrote about this when we was writing about atemporality, associating it with his ‘Zero History’ novel that he is working on. Gibson was saying that if you have a genuinely avant garde idea, something that’s really new, you should write about it or create about it as if it were being read twenty years from now. In other words, if you want to do this, you want to strip away the sci-fi chrome, the sense of wonder. You want it to be antique before it hits the page or the screen. Imagine that it was twenty years gone into the future. Just approach it from that perspective.

No longer allow yourself to be hypnotized by the sense of technical novelty. Just refuse to go there. Accept that it is already passe’, and create it from that point of view. Try to make it news that stays news.

Refuse the awe of the future. Refuse reverence to the past. If they are really the same thing, you need to approach them from the same perspective.

‘Recuperating forms of history that cannot be written.’ This is of tremendous interest. I think it escapes the literary traps of history. Just history that could not be written about. History about people who were not the winners, history about people who had no literatures. Pre- history. Human experience before the historical record was created.

http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2010/02/atemporality-for-the-creative-artist/

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The ‘pre-distressed antique futurity’. William Gibson wrote about this when we was writing about atemporality, associating it with his ‘Zero History’ novel that he is working on. Gibson was saying that if you have a genuinely avant garde idea, something that’s really new, you should write about it or create about it as if it were being read twenty years from now. In other words, if you want to do this, you want to strip away the sci-fi chrome, the sense of wonder. You want it to be antique before it hits the page or the screen. Imagine that it was twenty years gone into the future. Just approach it from that perspective.

No longer allow yourself to be hypnotized by the sense of technical novelty. Just refuse to go there. Accept that it is already passe’, and create it from that point of view. Try to make it news that stays news.

Refuse the awe of the future. Refuse reverence to the past. If they are really the same thing, you need to approach them from the same perspective.

‘Recuperating forms of history that cannot be written.’ This is of tremendous interest. I think it escapes the literary traps of history. Just history that could not be written about. History about people who were not the winners, history about people who had no literatures. Pre- history. Human experience before the historical record was created.

http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2010/02/atemporality-for-the-creative-artist/

I’m emailing you from the the Safety and Environmental Management Department. Our department is interested in designing an ergonomic poster that we can be given out to departments on campus. The reason I’m emailing you is because we were wondering if the New Media department would be interested in working with us in developing this poster. We believe by working with the New Media department, we can design something that is pleasing to the eyes, as well as something that can ensure the health and safety of the employees in our departments here on campus.

If this is something the New Media department would be interested in doing, please let me know, and we can arange a meeting.

Thanks and I look forward to hearing from you.

Seth Warren Ecology and Environmental Science Major Treasurer of Kappa Delta Phi Fraternity

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I’m emailing you from the the Safety and Environmental Management Department. Our department is interested in designing an ergonomic poster that we can be given out to departments on campus. The reason I’m emailing you is because we were wondering if the New Media department would be interested in working with us in developing this poster. We believe by working with the New Media department, we can design something that is pleasing to the eyes, as well as something that can ensure the health and safety of the employees in our departments here on campus.

If this is something the New Media department would be interested in doing, please let me know, and we can arange a meeting.

Thanks and I look forward to hearing from you.

Seth Warren Ecology and Environmental Science Major Treasurer of Kappa Delta Phi Fraternity

Date: Thu, 11 Mar 2010 20:55:02 +0000 From: “Jonathan Munro (TINT)” Subject: OPEN CALL: an exhibition of open source, hacking and modding LONDON

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Date: Thu, 11 Mar 2010 20:55:02 +0000 From: “Jonathan Munro (TINT)” Subject: OPEN CALL: an exhibition of open source, hacking and modding LONDON

Migrating Forms Festival May 14-23, 2010 Anthology Film Archives, New York

 CALL FOR ENTRIES  LAST CHANCE

Final Deadline: March 15, 2010

Go to http://migratingforms.org for full guidelines and instructions on how to submit 

 ACCREDITATION  NOW OPEN

Curators, distributors, programmers and writers

Email your name, contact information and affiliation to guests [AT] migratinforms [DOT] org

The 2010 program will be announced in April 

Migrating Forms is an annual festival of new experimental film from around the worldfeatures, shorts, documentaries, essays, film and video art and live performances. The festival focuses on work that often slips through the cracks at festivals that draw a stark distinction between the regular competition and the avant-garde. Formerly known as the New York Underground Film Festival (19932008), Migrating Forms presents work culled from other festivals, biennials, students, established avant-garde filmmakers, microcinemas, and galleries. The diverse body of work is situated in the common context of the cinema.

Last year’s inaugural festival featured new work by Stephanie Barber, Phil Collins, Barry Doupé, Bradley Eros, Kevin Jerome Everson, Jim Finn, Nikolaus Geyrhalter, Michael Gitlin, Barbara Hammer, Susan Hiller, Owen Land, Oliver Laric, Jeanne Liotta, Josephine Meckseper, Pavel Medvedev, Shana Moulton, Pat O’Neil, Lucy Raven, Ben Rivers, Michael Robinson, Amie Siegel, John Smith, Naomi Uman, Erika Vogt, and many more.

mailing address:

Migrating Forms

PO Box 1072 – Cooper Station

New York, NY 10276

info [AT] migratingforms [DOT] org

Migrating Forms – PO Box 1072 Cooper Station, New York, 10276, United States

Migrating Forms Festival May 14-23, 2010 Anthology Film Archives, New York

 CALL FOR ENTRIES  LAST CHANCE

Final Deadline: March 15, 2010

Go to http://migratingforms.org for full guidelines and instructions on how to submit 

 ACCREDITATION  NOW OPEN

Curators, distributors, programmers and writers

Email your name, contact information and affiliation to guests [AT] migratinforms [DOT] org

The 2010 program will be announced in April 

Migrating Forms is an annual festival of new experimental film from around the worldfeatures, shorts, documentaries, essays, film and video art and live performances. The festival focuses on work that often slips through the cracks at festivals that draw a stark distinction between the regular competition and the avant-garde. Formerly known as the New York Underground Film Festival (19932008), Migrating Forms presents work culled from other festivals, biennials, students, established avant-garde filmmakers, microcinemas, and galleries. The diverse body of work is situated in the common context of the cinema.

Last year’s inaugural festival featured new work by Stephanie Barber, Phil Collins, Barry Doupé, Bradley Eros, Kevin Jerome Everson, Jim Finn, Nikolaus Geyrhalter, Michael Gitlin, Barbara Hammer, Susan Hiller, Owen Land, Oliver Laric, Jeanne Liotta, Josephine Meckseper, Pavel Medvedev, Shana Moulton, Pat O’Neil, Lucy Raven, Ben Rivers, Michael Robinson, Amie Siegel, John Smith, Naomi Uman, Erika Vogt, and many more.

mailing address:

Migrating Forms

PO Box 1072 – Cooper Station

New York, NY 10276

info [AT] migratingforms [DOT] org

Migrating Forms – PO Box 1072 Cooper Station, New York, 10276, United States

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